Michigan 10

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1985

PLACE OF BIRTH: Dearborn, Michigan (near Detroit)

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: Subject was a college sophomore at the time of this interview.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She did little traveling until the age of 18, when she moved to Southern California to attend college, studying theatre arts.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Turna Mete (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 21/11/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Dearborn, Michigan. I was also raised there. My mom … my mom was born in Michigan as well, and she lived in Dearborn Heights, with her mom and dad and she had three brothers. They didn’t have much of a religion. They weren’t very into that. Um, they were, I think they … I’m pretty sure they were, like, a lower class and I know that my grandma was, urn, like, Scottish background. She was born in the United States, I’m not entirely sure where but I know her father was Scottish and I think her mother was, like, English or something. It’s very … I guess her mother was very, like, promiscuous, so a lot of her brothers and sisters … I don’t know if they have the same father. I’m not sure, too much about her. But my grandpa, also, he was born in the United States but he doesn’t know, like, his background at all, like, I guess … go … and my dad lived in Detroit with his parents and his, his two sisters and three brothers. And my grandparents on … his parents are from Ireland. They were born in Ireland. My grandpa had 13 brothers and sisters. And he was kicked out of his house when he was 14, and he met my grandma and they came over to the United States and they got married. And they’re devout, very, very, very strict, until this day, Catholics. My one aunt ended up moving back to Ireland, where they were from. I think that’s interesting. Their social status: I believe they were, like, lower, like, middle class, like, around there. But my mom and dad met after … oh, my mom got married when she was 17 and had my sister and then ended up getting divorced a couple years later. And then eventually married my dad and they had my brother and they had me, and we lived in Dearborn in a smaller house, and then when I was about 7 we moved literally two blocks on the same street, to a bigger house. ‘Cause I guess my dad got more money and we ended up living in a nicer house. And I went to Catholic school, my whole life, from when I was in kindergarten up until high school I had to wear a uniform and I … that was … also that was in between where my old house was and my new house was right down the block from where I lived. I ended up coming to California for college because I really like California and I wanted to study acting and I knew that would be a good place to study that especially at Cal State Fullerton and I … oh, also it was like relatively not inexpensive but within a range my family could afford, I guess. I ended up moving in, into an apartment that was kind of too far away from school. I lived with two girls that were not very nice and they … I ended up having to move out of there and I moved in, closer to school actually, like right across the street from school, which was a lot better because I didn’t have a car; and I ended up living with three really good roommates, which two of them I live with now. I have so far really enjoyed California. It’s really nice. I love the people. I going to school and I’m happy to be here.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Turna Mete (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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