Minnesota 6

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 21

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1987

PLACE OF BIRTH: Montivideo, Minnesota

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: acting student

EDUCATION: some college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She was raised in Becker, Minnesota, just northwest of Minneapolis. She moved to Orange County, California, and had been living there for three years at the time of this interview.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Because of her career in theatre, she has consciously been minimizing her accent.  Listen for California sounds mingled with her Minnesota sounds.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Amanda Barker (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/11/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

So, my mom and me came down here for the orientation that they do every summer, and we drove around; oh my God, it was horrible. We flew into Long Beach airport, which was stupid in itself, and, um, and then we like got on the freeway in the middle of, uh, like rush hour traffic and my mom had no idea where the hell she was going, at all. So we ended up, we thought we were in Fullerton but we were actually on the other side of Fullerton, like over by Malverne and those, like way over on that side of town. We stayed over there and woke up so early in the morning, and had to go to orientation and stuff, and drove around, found me a place, flew back to Minnesota. Couple months later, I flew out here. Her distant cousin picked me up from the airport. I brought my cat, Ninia, who I sedated, on the plane. We had a layover in Vegas; it was horrible. I had a litter box in my backpack, with my new computer, and when we had a layover, like, she was so drugged up that I had to bring her into the bathroom, and I had like a bag of litter, and I kept putting, I would put the litter out for her in hopes she would go to the bathroom, but she kept trying to run underneath all of the stalls, so I had to keep trying to catch her and, like, get her to go, and then we had to catch the next plane to go to California. It was the most horrible experience of my life. So I showed up here, and, um, he brought me to my apartment here in Fullerton and I walked around for four days, I didn’t know anybody, I didn’t have a fridge yet. I-it was hor- it was really weird. And then I started school; I was a dance major at first. And then I started, I got, I got hurt, I hurt my knee, so then I started acting, which is, which is cool, it’s just been different and hard and stuff, but I think dance is something more that comes more natural to me, and it’s something I-I have to work hard at, but it’s more am I lazy or not. I have no problem expressing myself in dance. Finding my expression in theatre is very different, it’s a lot harder for me, to, to trust myself and trust that I, I feel what I’m doing because there are so many different expectations and there’s so many different [stutters] y-y-, y’know, people, what people think is right and what people think is wrong, what certain people think is good theatre, other people think is horrible theatre, so it’s really subjective, as opposed to dance, y’know, if your foot is pointed or it’s not, I know whether or not you’re a good dancer, and you can kin- you can see that in someone else, but, it’s just different, but I, yeah, I think so. It’s cold in Minnesota. I friggin’ hate going back there for Christmas. I’m going back for five days, I’m excited, I’m bringing my boyfriend home with me again. And, last Christmas I went home for about, um, about two weeks. Froze my ass off. Oh my God, it was so bad. And I have to … I wear the same boots the whole time I’m there because I don’t have any other shoes, I don’t own any other shoes that I want to wreck in the slush and mud of k- winter. Y’know, I have nice flats I that wear here, like, y’know, things I can wear in the rain that’ll get wet but they won’t get gross and muddy. Everything there, the slush after it snows, like, y’know, the, the s- cars will be driving and stuff in the dirt and gravel, and then Minnesota is the only state that puts salt on the roads, and so it’ll melt the snow and it rusts your car. Like, Wisconsin uses dirt, the Dakotas use dirt, all that kinda stuff. We use salt that like, it, it heats, it’s a heating salt, so it like really rusts your car; it’s really nasty.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Amanda Barker (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/11/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.