Missouri 14

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1981

PLACE OF BIRTH: Springfield, Missouri

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was raised in Cassville, Missouri, and also lived in Shell Knob, Missouri. She is well traveled, as she describes in her unscripted speech.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject has been told that some of her vowels are “wrong.” She holds her teeth close together while speaking and doesn’t exhibit much openness on open vowels. Also note the significant lack of lip-rounding, especially in the unscripted conversation.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Saren Nofs-Snyder

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/04/2001

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Springfield, Missouri, but my parents lived out in the country, and I really enjoyed growing up there because we, we didn’t really have a lot of people around and that was nice growing up, although now I like the city a lot, but I can why people decide to move to, like, rural areas when they have kids because you get to run in the yard and such. I don’t know; that’s something I miss up here. A lot of times I’ll start thinking about, like,  even though now I don’t live out in the country I still [unclear] a lot more, you know, countryish than this,  but, yeah. And we would walk to the creek and stuff, and I really enjoyed growing up out in the country, but that was near a little town called Cassville, Missouri, and now I live in Shell Knob, but it’s so little that for high school we have to go to Cassville to go to high school, but that’s OK. We’ve got an elementary and everything, so that’s good but where I live now is, like, mostly old people. So, but Cassville is like the county seat, so it’s bigger and there’s a lot of little towns out there that are so small, you know, that they don’t have schools, and everyone goes to Cassville pretty much. I have some from Scotland and Ireland, and then I have a little bit of  Native American in me. That’s where the majority of it comes from is Scotland, I think. My favorite place is the Bahamas because we went there over Christmas, and usually when we go on vacation it’s really stressful, you know, because I have an older sister and at that time, like she wasn’t married or anything so she still went on vacation with us, and every time we’re too close, we fight. But on this vacation, we [unclear] … like my parents had there own room; we had our own room and had two beds, so it was easier; and we weren’t going all the time, so we all got along. It was great and it was so beautiful, and I’ve been to Mexico, but I’ve only been on the border, and it wasn’t really that nice, but I’ve been all around the United States, pretty much, like Washington and Virginia and Florida and Washington and Oregon.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Phil Hubbard

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 06/08/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.