Nevada 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 19

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1989

PLACE OF BIRTH: Gardnerville, Nevada

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: security guard and student

EDUCATION: Subject was a college sophomore at the time of the recording.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in the small town Gardnerville, south of Carson City, until the age of 14. At the time of this recording, he was living in California.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Dallas Miller

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/11/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

My own accent is, uh … it’s actually pretty variable. I spent, uh, most of my time from the ages of 8 through 15 learning every accent that I could get a hold of via media — you know, movies and what not. My sister and I both were, uh, we, we entertained ourselves for hours imitating the movies. Uh, “Austin Powers” was actually the first movie that inspired our “linguistic habits” and then, uh, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” was the uh, kinda the catalyst for us learning the  English accent, at least, and since then we’ve pretty been going one after the another, learning all the uh … well, pretty much as many as we could. So, today, you know, I’m 19 years old; I’ve been doing it for so long that all I have to do is watch “Pirates of the Caribbean” and I will fall into and get stuck in an English accent for like an hour or so. It’s, uh [laughs], it’s like people that lived in Oklahoma, like my mother for instance — she used to live in Oklahoma — whenever she, uh, has a couple a drinks or if she’s around somebody from that area, she starts talking like she’s from Oklahoma, and it’s actually really annoying because we can’t get her to stop. But, you know, I kinda feel HER pain when I do that, though, ‘cause, you know, her having done it to me I … [laugh] I’m sure — I can sympathize with her whenever I drop to into an accent, but the funny thing about me, though ugh, is that, uh, sometimes I’ll drop into an accent and I won’t stay in THAT accent; I’ll JUMP from that accent to another one, back to that one and into another one again. So, on a bad day, I’ll go from English to Scottish to Irish to French to Canadian to English again, and then to Mexican to Australian to Japanese to you know, whatever accents I have in my inventory — I have so many of them I don’t even know what I have anymore! But, when I do that it even drives my sister nuts, and she knows at least as many accents as I do. So [laughs], I don’t know; it’s fun, though. I like to, uh, to play with people, you know. Sometimes the, the first day of class at a new semester people will ask me for my name and I’ll say my name, you know, and then, but I won’t say it in an American accent. I’ll say it, you know, in an English accent or something, and they’ll ask me, “Are you from England?” and I’ll say, “Well, yeah, maybe,” and they’ll kinda look at me all funny and I’ll just kinda smile innocently and pretend that my answer was TOTALLY NORMAL. And leave them confused for the rest of the class period. And then I’ll usually wait a couple of days [laugh] before I, uh, jump back into my own native accent that you’re hearing now. And I actually did this in high school. People were SHOCKED when they learned that I wasn’t from London [laughs]. I was very pleased with myself, needless to say.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Dallas Miller

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/11/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.