New York 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 37

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1962

PLACE OF BIRTH: eastern Long Island, New York

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: nurse

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject grew up in eastern Long Island and was living in Yonkers (just north of Manhattan) at the time of this interview.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject speaks carefully and precisely and with a love of words. She is a good model for higher socio-economic characters.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Katherine Burke

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/1999

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

It’s the annual Christmas tree decorating story at Maureen’s home.  Please note the definition of annual cannot be found in Webster’s Dictionary, according to my terms, because “annual” does not mean annual.  It means whenever I’m ready.  But this is the premise of the way it works.  It begins Saturday after Thanksgiving every year, when I go to the Girardi Christmas tree farm, and I pick out my Christmas tree, the best Christmas tree that would fit into my apartment.  And it’s picked out with tender-loving care, etc.  And I pay for the Christmas tree that day, but you see, I don’t take it home that day.  I ask the Girardis if they will hold it for me, with my name on it, “paid,” until I’m ready to take it home.  And so the first year, they said “lovely.” And they said, “When do we think we’ll see you again?”  And I said, “Oh, probably not until December 27th or so.”  And any of — they’ve learned that I don’t take my Christmas tree home until after Christmas.  I like to avoid the rush, you see. …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/10/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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