New York 28

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 29

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/10/1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Dominican Republic

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Dominican

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: Subject completed high school and was a college undergraduate at the time of this recording.

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She was born and raised in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, where she lived until age 14. From age 14 on, she lived in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, in New York City. She has lived in the Bronx for the last few years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 08/03/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Um, I grew up in the Dominican Republic, in the capital, in Santo Domingo, and it was just cool. Like, we had, we have a big family, and we would do these gatherings, and there was — we had like this little street where, um, my great grandmother lived, and all of us sort of grew up there, and so all the family would get together and the street would be closed, and there would be music outside, and we would dance, and make so much food, and it was just fun. So, about like, six years ago or so we moved to the Bronx. I don’t like the Bronx. [Interviewer: Why?] Because my people are not there. [laughs] There are some Dominicans, but it’s predominately African-American, and it’s just not, ya know, home. Washington Heights is like, you have all Dominican businesses, and everything is for Dominicans and from Dominicans, and it’s just cool.

Well, in the Dominican Republic, we cut the S’s out of the words; uh, we replace the R’s for, like, I’s or L’s, and it’s just, like, very choppy, ya know? Um, and, we speak very fast too, um, and we kinda have like our own Spanish. Like I tell my friend, like, “OK, after you learn Spanish, then you need to learn Dominican Spanish” because it’s different, ya know? And, um, I’ve been to Ecuador and Colombia, and I have to change the way that I speak because it’s not the same kind of Spanish.

[Subject speaks in Spanish.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Shawnia Keith (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/05/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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