New Zealand 13

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 17

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1989

PLACE OF BIRTH: Pukekohe, New Zealand (south of Auckland)

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I’m from Pukekohe.  It’s, um, south of Auckland, and south of Auckland is pretty much, the drunge, but my Pukekohe, Pukekohe and Botany, which is close to me as well, is the nice part.  Where Pukekohe is becoming really quite fancy, at the moment, because it’s out of Auckland, and it’s sort of country-ish. But, it’s so close to Auckland, like traveling times and stuff.  So a lot of big Auckland people are moving out of, you know and coming to Puke.  Um… and like Katy, we have lots of Maoris and lots of, like Pacific Asians, and our schools are highly populated by them, and they’re just all around the community especially and other towns of South Auckland, like, Otara is just, you just don’t see white people.  They’re not being racist, it’s just a Polynesian district.  And while Pukekohe, I’d say, is more … its more European, but we seem to get a lot a lot of English people coming in here, just because, we need more cops in the area.  They’re coming over. Pukekohe is a big growing thing.  We grow lots of potatoes and onions.  Um, because of that, we also have lots of Indians.  Lots and lots of Indians, so… I think that’s where it sparked my interest of India.  No, I really want to go and I was going to be going in September, if I didn’t get accepted into this school, so … I’m not going now, but it’s OK, because I’m here, so … I love … I love, love, love shopping (laughs), which is such an Aucklander thing to say, but I love shopping, and I love taking other people shopping and shopping for them, but with their money.  Yeah, I, I love styling people.  Um, I love sewing and I love acting, so it always kind of made sense to put them two together into a costume course.  I think, I think the lo- the thing I love about clothing in general is that it can really identify somebody, I mean, everybody puts their own personal touch into their clothing whether they know it or not, I mean you go into a store and you’re not going to pick up the first thing you see.   You’re going to look at it and go, “Oh yeah, that attracts the eye.”  So, even if you did just pick it up, it’s still attracting you in some way, so it’s going, “Oh, you’re that to me.”  You’re not going to pick up the ugliest thing you think in the store.  So, I think, just the style, it can create living clothes, and the differences in culture and people from different areas, as well.  So that’s very cool.  I know, uh, what pisses me off?  Um, people who try to control me.  I, I hate people who are really overbearing on me and I just… just want to, like, tell them to just … Can I swear?  I just want to tell them, “Fuck off,” you know, just,  “Leave me alone. You’re not my mother.”  And it’s, yeah, it just, I like to do my own thing.  I’m very individual, and I hate … even when I’m buying clothes, I hate buying things, that’s like, “Oh, everybody’s going to have that top.”   Or, “Everybody has those shoes.”  I refuse to buy them.  Just because its like, oh I really don’t want to look the same as everybody else.  And I think that’s why I hate, I mean I don’t mind teachers telling me what to do, because I’m learning from them, but it’s other people telling me just because they feel like it.  Not because, you know, they’re trying to teach me something.  But yeah, that really annoys me.  South Auckland slang is very, “Whatever bro, ow.”  “Ow!”  That’s, that’s sort of a lot what the Maoris and Samoans use rather, to me.  “Ow’s just like a person, and it’s very much, um, white chick.  Like, I have a lot of friends, who are Samoan and we’d always joke.  Be like, “I is the white chick.”  It’s just, its very, like, very lazy language … what they use, um.  “Oy!” is just what you call somebody.  It’s like, “Oy, come here.”

TRANSCRIBED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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