New Zealand 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 40s

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1950s

PLACE OF BIRTH: Auckland, New Zealand

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: professional but no other details provided

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Linda Cartwright

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 1999

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, my grandfather and grandmother, they were – their parents – they’re first cousins actually, from London, and both their parents were butchers, I think, in the meat markets there and they often said … they had these wonderful things that I sort of based my life upon, perhaps … um, my nana used to say things like, “Clothes maketh the man” or “Handsome is as handsome does”. My unc, grandfather was always on about things like black – I don’t know why he was always talking about black but it was “black as your hat,” “black as the ace of spades,” often referring to people – quite a racist undercurrent there. “Black as nougat’s knocker” is what he said – I don’t know what it was he was refer – nougat’s knocker – I could never figure that one out. But there was this other one he often used to call me, what I thought he was calling me, “a daft aphid,” and I knew aphids to be small green insects that lived on plants. I could never figure it out but later as an adult I did find out what he was saying was, “you’re a daft ha’pennyworth.” We still had, no, we didn’t have ha’pennies then, or did we? I can’t remember; it was well before we had decimal coins, anyway, we did know pennies and shillings and things, but yeah, so yeah, I thought I, I learned a lot of those kind of phrases without actually knowing what on earth they meant but they were very fascinating nonetheless.

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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