New Zealand 6

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples.  IDEA is a free resource;  please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 27

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/06/1977

PLACE OF BIRTH: Christchurch, New Zealand

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: restaurant manager

EDUCATION: college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject lived in Johannesburg, South Africa, for a year.  Later he moved to America, where he lived in Illinois and Kansas, and traveled throughout the country.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Andrew Johnson

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/05/2004

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in, uh, Christchurch, New Zealand, uh, June, 29, 1977. Uh, Christchurch is an old English town on the south island down in the bottom corner of the world. Uh, it’s a wonderful place to live. It’s very clean. Uh, you’re in a modernized city, so that’s fun. But you’re also an hour from the, the mountains and the hills; skiing, fishing, hunting, um, tramping. Uh, the city’s population is three-hundred-fifty-thousand and climbing. Uh, New Zealand has a population of three-and-a-half million. I lived there for most of my life up until the age of about 18. Um, and then when I was 18, I moved to South Africa, and I lived in Johannesburg for a year. Uh, I went to school there, to a college called St. John’s College, a very wealthy, white, predominantly white college. Um, and that was a lot of fun. I lived in the dorms there, dormitories, uh, for a year. And then I went back to Christchurch, New Zealand, where I studied, uh, marketing and management at the University of Canterbury. Uh, I did three and half years at the University of Canterbury before I, uh, decided to come to America and join a company called Jimmy Johns, and we do, uh, gourmet sub sandwiches. And I started living in Champagne, Illinois. Traveled around the country for them, and now I’m here in Lawrence, uh, opening, uh, Jimmy Johns’ stores for them here in Kansas. So that’s pretty much, uh, a short, brief history about where I’ve been and what I’m up to. My accent always gets me into a lot of interesting situations. And, uh, I was working, and it was about two or three in the morning, and we’ve got a line at the cash register, and I’m on the cash register selling the sandwiches. And, uh, a girl comes up and goes, you know, uh, you know, “Can I have the sandwich, a number ten?” or whatever it was. And I said to her, “Sure, that’s no problem. Do you want a drink?” And she said “Yes.” And the girl, I, I leaned forward to the girl and I said, you know, “How ’bout a cookie?” And, uh, she looked at me and she, she sort of stuttered and sort of leaned back a little bit, and all the guys look up that were making sandwiches on the make line with me, and I, and I said to this girl “Would you want a cookie?” And she leaned forward and goes, “No thanks. My boyfriend’s at the other end.” And I look at her, and I’m like, “You thought I meant a ‘quickie,’ didn’t you?” And she’s like, “Ahhh!” And I’m like, “No. I said a cookie.” So she bought one anyway because of embarrassment. And I, uh, so I sold her an extra cookie. So, that was pretty funny. My accent gets me in and out of a lot of situations. So, she thought I was meaning a “quickie,” but, uh, I said, I said a “cookie.”
[* = vocal pause]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jennifer Krause

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.