North Carolina 22

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 29

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 08/12/1983

PLACE OF BIRTH: Greenville, North Carolina

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student, music director

EDUCATION: Subject has a master’s degree in choral conducting and was pursuing his doctorate at the University of Kansas at the time of this recording.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Speaker had lived in Greenville, North Carolina, his entire life until his move to Kansas a few months before this recording was made.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The speaker’s study of choral conducting has somewhat impacted his Southern dialect. His knowledge of IPA and his attention to desired American choral diction has given him an awareness of aspects of his own dialect and how it differs with other dialects.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Katherine Joelle Dick (under supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/11/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

OK, so, I … have one brother. Um, we’d always live with our parents; our parents [are] still together. Um, I will tell you something interesting. Um, I grew up in a house across the street from my grandparents’. Next to our house was, uh, my dad’s brother’s house; um, he has two kids. Uh, next to his house is my dad’s sister, um, who also had two kids. Next to her, uh, my grandma’s sister lived there, and next to her was another one of my grandma’s sisters. So, I kind of grew up in a really small village sort of thing — more like a crossroads — um, so it was a really cool way to grow up. We had some woods behind our house. We would, um, cut trails back in the woods, and just kind of play in those on the weekend. Um, there was a country store down the road from where we lived. Um, so, most days after school, we would just walk down, um, buy a candy bar or something and come back and play and stuff. So, um, you know, kind of small town, kind of cool way to grow up.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Katherine Joelle Dick (under supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION: 20/11/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

The subject has retained many of the features of the Southern dialect in his speech:

The /ing/ endings of present participles are shortened, sounding as [ɪn].

Many vowels have a tendency to be “drawled.”

There’s a modification of the final /l/ or /ll/ in words such as “call” to a close, lip-rounded back vowel.

The subject speaks rather leisurely and languidly, highlighting parts of speech with elongation of vowels, rather than emphasis on consonants, increased volume, or faster pace.

COMMENTARY BY: Katherine Joelle Dick (under supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/11/2013

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.