Oregon 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1985

PLACE OF BIRTH: Portland, Oregon

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: legal transcriptionist and independent contractor

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in southwest Washington State as a child.  At the time of the recording, the subject lived in Maryland (in the greater Washington, D.C., area).

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Subject

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 23/11/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, originally I was born in Portland, Oregon.  My parents moved us around a lot, me and my little sister.  She and I are about three years and a day apart.  It’s funny, because she was born a day after me, but she’s three years younger than I am.  But anyway, so we moved around almost every year.  I lived generally in the Metropolitan Area of Portland; St. John’s, Gresham, Troutdale, and those general areas.  And I’m sure that there’s probably more, but I can’t really remember them very well.  When I was 10 years old, my parents moved us up — me and my sister — up to southwest Washington, just across the river, so I could still go and see my grandma, if I wanted to.  And I grew up there until I was 21 years old.  I graduated from high school; it was the first I was able to graduate from school for four years.  A little late, but who cares, right?  As far as moving around is concerned.  So, I didn’t have a whole lot of friends; I was kind of a loner.  But I really, really loved choir music, and I was in choir for five years.  When I turned 21, I moved cross-country with a friend of mine to Baltimore, Maryland, where I lived for about two or three nights.  After that, we moved down to the D.C. metropolitan area, where I am currently living.  I was a receptionist.  Which was really very interesting.  You get to hear a lot of different types of people, all over the country because the product that, from the company that I was working for, the product was very well-known on the East Coast.  But I had never really even heard of it until I moved here.  But people who grew up in the baby-boomer era were very familiar.  And even though they moved away, to all kinds of places, they would still — they had interest in getting the product.  So I got to do a lot of over-the-phone sales, and it was a kind of a game, a fun thing for me to do, to try and locate where each person was from originally because of the way they sounded.  And I was, I got pretty good at it, actually.  Being able to tell if somebody was from New York or Jersey, or of they were from the Deep South, or if they were from Texas versus Missouri.  And that was really fun.  I got in trouble a lot though, because I would keep talking a little longer than I was supposed to.  But it’s fun talking to people.  I enjoy talking to people, and hearing their stories, so.  Yeah, that’s definitely true.

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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