Oregon 2

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.



BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 47

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/01/1967

PLACE OF BIRTH: Medford, Oregon

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: teacher

EDUCATION: three master’s degrees: folklore, music/anthropology/English, and education

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

After being raised in Ashland, Oregon, the subject lived in Bursa, Turkey, for nine months; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the United States, for six years; and Puerto Rico for 20 months. At the time of this recording, he had been living back in Oregon for more than 14 years now.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The subject speaks French and Turkish, and had some acting training as a child at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Naomi Joy Todd

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/10/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in southern Oregon, in Medford, Oregon, where my parents were living at the time, and after less than a year of living there, I moved to Ashland, which is a small community right next to Medford. Medford was a pretty large mill town — Ashland never had a decent-sized lumber mill; we had flourmills and some other small wood finishing things going on, and the very first Shakespearean theater in the United States. We also had a normal school, which became a college and then became a university. Um, it’s a small town, and, uh, when I was first growing up there it was pretty rural. A lot of my neighbors had dead deer carcasses in their garages every winter, but, uh, you know as I got older it became a lot more gentrified. And, uh, the composition of the town changed quite a bit. Uh, the people who were living there when I was younger had a much more pronounced — I think — rural accent. They had, um, their “r”’s were darker, and they had expressions that were more from probably regions of North Carolina, Oklahoma, that kind of thing — when people migrated out of those impoverished areas during the Depression. Um, I can say for a fact that my grandparents on my mother’s side, they were from, uh — my grandmother was from — from, um, North Dakota. She had an accent that was sometimes borderline, uh, Midwesternish, and they had — they had vocabulary words that I don’t use, like “dabano” for a couch. And, uh, they’d say things like “see meant,” [laughs] or “cement” for the concrete. Um, in terms of my growing up in my hometown, it’s hard to see your own accent. I don’t think I noticed that — I think the first time I noticed that I had an accent that was maybe more, more rural than, than I would have liked at the time was when I, uh, visit my friends in San Francisco. What I noticed was that, uh, uh, people in the city that I saw there — the ones that were from around the Pacific Northwest had kind of a drawly, you know, tendency when they talked, um, so I suppose I have some of that.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Naomi Joy Todd

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/10/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.