Oregon 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 21

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/03/1996

PLACE OF BIRTH: Salem, Oregon

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: three years of undergraduate education

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She has gone to school in Ashland, Oregon, for three years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Her mother and father were born in Utah and California, respectively.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/04/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

So I grew up in Kaiser, Oregon, and I was born in Salem, Oregon. Uh, Kaiser is just a suburb of, uh, the Salem city. Uh, I have a mom and a dad. My mom was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, and my dad was born in Santa Monica, California. Uh, my brother and sister were born in Sacramento, and then, uh, my family moved up to Salem, uh, and that’s where I was born.

I have a dog. His name’s Finnegan. And he’s a King Charles Spaniel and a Papillon, and his favorite activities are playing tug-of-war and searching for new things outside. My dog is actually a registered, uh, therapy animal for comfort to people with anxiety, and so I can take him anywhere. He’s been to the movies; he’s been to grocery stores, to college courses, uh, on airplanes. And everywhere he goes, uh, he brings joy to people and relieves them of stress and anxiety.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/04/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

I observed the speaker having somewhat retracted lip corners, creating a spread sound on many lip-rounded vowels vowels (“tune”).
The tongue is close to the roof of the mouth, creating a flattened space for vowels. For example: Mary Harrison, times, and).
For words with -ing endings, the speaker uses a bright [i].
The speaker often glottalizes final t. This is not completely consistent. For example: jacket, kit, foot, strut, different, out, lot, can’t.
R is very hard in general (for, work).
I hear the speaker tending to upward inflect at the ends of many thoughts, and some vocal fry is also present at the ends of some sentences.
COMMENTARY BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/04/2017

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.