Papua New Guinea 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 56

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/05/1959

PLACE OF BIRTH: Onima, Chimbu (Simbu Province) in the Papua New Guinea Highlands.

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Black/Papua New Guinean

OCCUPATION: taxi driver

EDUCATION: grade 6

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has lived in Australia for approximately 20 years. She came across to the mainland as an adult and was living in Cairns, Queensland, Australia, at the time of this recording.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: 

She learned English through exposure to television and during her elementary/primary school education.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Wendy Mocke

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/02/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

My dear, today I’m driving taxis — not busy; I’m so tired. Tried to make monies. Trent’s out there angry with it. But I’m all right — I come home, I’m happy.

[Subject speaks in Tok Pisin (Pidgin)]: Aiyo tudei ya em Sundei tasol ya tasol mi go wok ya em hat wok ya mi wok wok i go na mi no mekim moni na mi belhat ya. I wish mi rich meri na mi no wok mi stap lo haus.

[Translation: Today is only Sunday, but I went to work and it was hard work. I worked a lot but don’t make enough money and I get angry. I wish I was a rich woman and I could stay at home and not work.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Linda Nicholls-Gidley; Pidgin transcribed by Wendy Mocke

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 01/03/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Nurse set tends to be realised as /ɛː/.

Fricatives tend to be held for an extended time.

Post-alveolar fricative /ʃ/ in words such as “washed,” “much,” and “official” is produced as /s/.

GOAT vowel is realised as a monophthong /oː/.

Yod dropping is evident in the words such as “duke”/duˑk/ and “tune” /tuˑn/; a diphthong replaces the /ju/ in the word “new” /niu/.

COMMENTARY BY: Linda Nicholls-Gidley

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/04/2016

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.