Papua New Guinea 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 24

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 22/10/1991

PLACE OF BIRTH: Port Moresby

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: black/Papua New Guinean

OCCUPATION: civil engineer

EDUCATION: tertiary education

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in Queensland, Australia, for seven years and in the Northern Territory, Australia, for two years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject learned English at school and through television.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Wendy Mocke

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/02/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

My partner really likes to watch House of Cards on Netflix. Yeah. We spent all of Valentine’s Day watching that show.

[Subject speaks in Tok Pisin (pidgin)]: Ol hailens man ya ol sa gat traipla nus na traipla maus gras so olgeta taim yu lukim ol na ol singaut taim maus blo ol em traipla nogut tru.

[Translation: Highlands men have big noses and big moustaches, and every time you see them and they start to shout, their mouths are very big.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Linda Nicholls-Gidley

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/04/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

There is some tongue retraction evident, particularly in the open back vowel /ɒ/, in words such as “old,” “bowl,” and “job.”

The open back vowel /ɑ/ is used for both “bath” (the second time the word “bath” is heard the subject uses /ɑ̟/) and “palm.”

Note the open-mid vowel /ɔ/.

Some rhoticity is evident in the NURSE set, but it is inconsistent, present in the words “her,” “work,” and “bird,” but not in the word “nurse.” Rhoticity is also present in the words “hurry” and “there.”

Open front vowel /æ/ is used in “Sarah.”

Notice the lack of /j/ in the word “tune.”

The subject tends to reduce the length of diphthongs or monophthongs when they are followed by another vowel, in words such as “area” /eɹɪ̆ɐ/, “tire” /tɑĕɐ/, “diagnosis” /dɑĕgnosəs/, “immediately” /imĭdĭə̆t̚liː/.

Intervocalic /t/ can be tapped, become voiced /t̬/ or be aspirated: “beautiful” /bjuɾəfʊ/, “start a” /stɐˑɾɐ/, “strut around” /stɾɐɾɐɹaun̪/, “administered” / ædminiˑst̬ɚd/, “practice” / pɹæk̚t̬əs/, and “futile” / fjʉtɑᵊɫ/.

Intervocalic /d/can be tapped: “headed” /hɛɾəd̚/, “made her” /mɛɪɾɝ/, “made an” /mɛɪɾən/, and “medicine’ /mɛdᵊsən/.

Notice the addition of pitch and intonation for emphasis in the Pidgin.

COMMENTARY BY: Linda Nicholls-Gidley

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/06/2016

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

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