Paraguay 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Asuncion, Paraguay

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Hispanic

OCCUPATION: college student

EDUCATION: three years of college study at the time of this interview

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The subject says her parents required that she and her sisters learn English as children, so as to better communicate in the larger world.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Jordan White

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 01/05/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

‘K, now I am going to tell a story. Umm, when I was 15 I went to Russia with my family, and we thought that English was spoken all over the world; that’s why my parents made my sisters and I learn English. But apparently in Russia a lot of people still refuse to learn English, although I had the opportunity to do so. So anyway we, umm, there is six of us so we had to split the group in two taxis, and we each took, umm, there were three of in a taxi and three of us in another taxi and we tried to go to a museum, but I guess the taxi driver that I was, umm, in the cab I was in couldn’t understand us. So I don’t know, we ended up in a weird zone in town and I had no way to tell him, you know, where our hotel was. But the way we solved it was we saw, we saw a hotel with signs and we told him to stop there and fortunately the people in the hotel knew, umm, some English, so we were able to get back, umm, to our hotel, and from there call my father who was in the other taxi so he could come back and pay the taxi driver, which was, who was pretty upset about the whole situation. So, anyway, I was just happy that I knew English, and, I mean, it doesn’t have to be English, but it has to be some form of communication that everybody can understand. Or people should learn more of other languages. Either one of those. Thank you.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jordan White

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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