Philippines 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 41

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1956

PLACE OF BIRTH: Mabalacat, in Pampanga Province, about 200 km north of Manila

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Filipino

OCCUPATION: journalist/writer

EDUCATION: college degree in mass communications

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Though the subject was born and raised in the Philippines, English was the “medium of instruction” when he attended school.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Brian Prugalidad (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/10/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I’m 41. … I come from, umm, a town called Mabalakat, and that town is in Pampanga province in the Luzon Island. Eee, it’s in central part of Luzon. That’s about 200 kilometers, uh, from Mega Manila, going up north. Uh, I finished Mass Communication in college. As early as in, in the grade school level, uh, we have, uh, English as part of the curriculum from grade school, ung, all the way up to college. Oh yes! It … like, English was medium of instruction in schools. Now it’s different. Like after 1986, uh, when Cory Aquino was president, or when she got to be president, they made Pilipino as the medium of instruction and, that is, well, two years before I graduated in college. Unn, yeah, there are. There are still, um, uh, subjects that, uh, that are taught, being taught, in, in English. I think there, they’re seriously considering, uh, restoring English as a medium of instructions. I do… my, my formal employment is, uhh, for, uh, Clark Development Corporation where I do public relations work mostly, media relations, um… yeah, I, I did press releases, uh, I, I make sure that, uh, our company and, uh, the zone or the place that our company manages, that’s Clark Freeport zone, looks good before the general public. And the other job I have, ah, which is my vocation, is, uh, uh, being a journalist. I write column articles for a daily newspaper in Pampanga. Yeah, as a, as a journalist I make it a point that I get out of my comfort zone in, in where I’m based at in Clark and I get out to practice my profession as a journalist, at least once a year I can do. For three straight years now, I, I, I’m covering, I covered, uh, the United Nations General Assembly. I was in New York for three weeks for those, uh, media stuff. Coverage stuff, I mean. It’s only in Pampanga where I stayed, uh, since childhood [chuckles], and once in awhile I get to spend vacation in, in metro Manila.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Brian Prugalidad (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

During the interview, the subject talks about where he is from, the subject of English as to how it relates to him and his upbringing, and his profession and vocation. What the listener will encounter upon hearing this are, in general, repetition and elongation of words when trying to get ideas out and volume for emphasis. “Th” sounds are replaced with “d.” “Sh” is replaced with “s.” Vowels are centralized.

COMMENTARY BY: Brian Prugalidad (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/10/2007

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.