Philippines 11

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 25

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/11/1988

PLACE OF BIRTH: San Fernando (Pampanga), Philippines

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Filipino of Kapampangan ancestry

OCCUPATION: telephone interviewer

EDUCATION: college/university

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has not lived outside Cavite or Pampanga for longer than six months.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject’s exposure to English is mainly through formal education and work. She has worked almost exclusively with British and European colleagues and customers for the past two years as an outsourced telephone interviewer for a UK-based company. Her interests, such as literature and media, are also often only available in English.

Subject is not a fluent speaker of her parents’ mother tongue (Kapampangan) and is more comfortable with either Tagalog or English.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/08/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

So, I’m from Bacoor, Cavite, but I was born in San Fernando, Pampanga. I’m currently 25 years of age, and I’m currently working for, um, an RPO company, although it’s more like a global-talent management company. Um, as for my studies, I’ve studied, uh, at a Catholic school; it’s, uh, St. Paul College in Parañaque, and then after high school, I went to De La Salle University Manila and I took up, um, uh, bachelor’s science in psychology. Um, what I do mostly at my work is I usually conduct interviews, um, for candidates based in the UK for a financial account, and I basically conduct values-based interviews, so it’s more focused on, um, the company’s values on how they match the values of the candidates.

I’ve, I’ve learned English since I was in kindergarten when I went to school in St. Paul’s. Um, w- well, I basically started with the basics like learning the alphabet and then learning a few phrases, and then, eventually, um, I’ve learned how to read in English and I got to enjoy reading a lot of stories in English around, um, fourth grade, and um, I’ve bec- I became more interested in the idiomatic expressions. And then, I basically, um, had this, um, wh- how should I say, like, I became fond of reading books in English and, um, I’m usually more comfortable thinking or speaking to myself in English or expressing my thoughts in English, in writing. But in terms of speaking to people, I would prefer my first language. First language would be Tagalog.

I was, I was born in Pampanga; both my parents are Kapampangan; however, I was raised here, um, in Manila. Um, we first moved in to Sucat, Parañaque, and, um, my dad would often speak to us in Tagalog instead of Kapampangan, so unfortunately I never really got to learn how to speak the language fluently. However, I could understand a few, a few words, a few phrases. Um, speaking the language, not really that confident.

And then, a phrase in Tagalog: [Subject recites text from Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Tagalog] Ang lahat ng tao ay ipinanganak ng malaya at pantay-pantay. [English translation: All human beings are born free and equal.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/07/2015

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.