Philippines 13

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 65

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 18/05/1952

PLACE OF BIRTH: Santa Cruz, Laguna, Phillipines

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Filipino

OCCUPATION: Retired United States Navy

EDUCATION: two years of college

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

He moved to California, in the United States, in 1973 and has lived there ever since. He was stationed in the following locations during his time in the United States Navy: Sasebo, Japan;
San Diego, California; Hemet, California; and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Andre Vernot (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 17/03/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

We have a lot of lizard on the ceiling, and at nighttime they came out and they run around our ceiling and they poop and pee, um, while we were laying down, and the poop goes down, and sometimes it hit us, so — that’s every night. And we had a bat living in our attic and whenever — at nighttime they come out, but at daytime they come back, and there’s like a hundred of them in there; and every time it rains – we had a hole in our roof – and the water that come out is — sometimes the bat is — peeps and poo is coming down from the ceiling.

Oh yeah! We have pigs. I feed the pigs and clean them and bathe them. We have to shovel their f- their poops all the time.

We walk every day, rain or shine. We were closer to school. My mother is a teacher. We used to walk every day. We never ride a car then – there’s no car. We had like 5 cents on our pocket to buy food. And then after school we’d play in the ground, and we didn’t come home until later. We’d play hide and seek, uh, tag. We used to go to the river and swim in the river. I was 3 years old, and I used to go to the river without, uh, nobody, just me and our friends; and we swim in the river. They throw the trash in the river; we still swim in the river, even if it’s flooded. We used to go to the bridge and jump on the bridge. We – sometimes we hit – we hit a tree or anything that is floating in the river. Sometimes it’s a poop and – [laughs]. A lot of kids drown in the river.

It is a saltwater crocodile, but it goes in the river, and they can go in the river because it’s the — it’s like a delta. And they goes inside the river, and they attack people for food, uh, but, when he got caught, it was big; it was twenty feet. But we don’t have any in our hometown. I only remember once that we have a crocodile in our river, and they caught it.

[Subject tells the following joke in Tagalog]:

Nawalang Bata
Nanay: Oh! Anak kahit anu mangyari huwag kang bumitaw sa pagkakapit sa palda ko.
Mahigit ng isang oras ng mapansin ng nanay na wala na ang kanyang anak.
Nanay: Manong may nakita po ba kayong bata?
Sekyu: Ano po ba ang itsura.
Nanay: Nay dalang palda po.

[English Translation:

Lost Child
Mom: Oh! Child, whatever happens, do not let go of my skirt.
Over an hour goes by before the mom notices she is without her son.
Mom: Have you seen my son?
Guard: What does he look like?
Mom: He is carrying my skirt.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Andre Vernot (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 17/03/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.