Philippines 4

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 26

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 17/06/1986

PLACE OF BIRTH: Imus, Cavite, Philippines

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Filipino of Tagalog ancestry

OCCUPATION: trainer

EDUCATION: college

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: Subject has not lived outside Imus.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject’s speech may have been influenced by relatives and close friends who were raised bilingual (English and Tagalog). Subject’s early exposure to Anglo-American media might also have led to a slight Americanization of her accent.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/05/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

So, I’m 26 years old. And I live in Imus, Cavite. I went to, um, local schools when I was in, um … I got my, my primary education in the local school, my secondary education, as well as my, uh, my degree or would-have-been degree at a university. Um, at the university, I studied AB Psychology, because I’ve always been fascinated with people. But, somewhere in the course of my studying, I changed my mind. I got out of school, and started my first job in what is known to most as the Business Process Outsourcing industry or the BPO. Growing up, I did not come from a household that spoke English. My parents did not … we … it was not a medium of communication. Um, it was not, how … I did not talk in English with my friends in the neighborhood, or my friends in school. In school, of course, the, the medium for learning was in English, but, um, outside the classroom, English would stop there. Uh, English would stop in the classroom. Outside, we would still converse in Tagalog. Um [pauses] but [pauses] I guess, it’s the work experience. It’s, mm’uh, generally, the work experience that gave me this, uh — what do you call it? It’s sort of, um, [pauses] the grasp of the language? Well, simply because the different jobs that I’ve had required it. So, this is how I talk now. This is how I’m comfortable [pauses] conversing. I guess you could say this is my accent, whatever it is. And yes! There!

[Counts in Tagalog:] Isá, dalawá, tatló, apat, limá, anim, pitó, waló, siyám, sampû. Pagbibiláng sa Tagalog. [English translation: One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. Counting in Tagalog.]

[Recites a Tagalog nursery rhyme:] Akó ay may lobo, lumipád sa langit. ‘Di ko na nakita, pumutók na palá. Nasayang lang ang pera na ipinambilí ng lobo. Sa pagkain sana; nabusóg pa akó. [English translation: My money went to waste, buying that balloon. If I had bought food, I would be full instead. I had a balloon; it flew to the sky. Never saw it again; turns out it popped.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/05/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

The subject was born and raised in Imus, Cavite, and is a native speaker of Tagalog. The dialect that is spoken in Cavite province is classified under the southern group of Tagalog dialects. Although she uses Standard Central Tagalog (Filipino) in her reading, the subject speaks her own dialect with family members and neighbors. This dialectal code-switching is very common with younger generations who were raised in the provinces but work in Manila.

In the full interview, she recounts how she was raised in a neighborhood where English was not a primary language (as in most rural Filipino households). She tells us that although English was the medium of instruction in school, she learned most of her English from bilingual relatives, films, and television. It is noticeable that the subject uses a more Americanized accent of Philippine English.

Additional features:

  • Subject has some difficulty with /θs/ cluster, pronouncing it as /ts/ (“North Square”), and the voicing of /s/ (“disease,” “goose’s”).
  • Subject uses PALM /ɑː/ (“odd,” “job,” “not”) similar to GenAm pronunciation and unlike a typical Tagalog accent which uses TRAP /æ/.
  • Unlike a typical Tagalog accent, subject employs yod dropping in “duke” and “tune.”
  • Subject uses a flap in “letter” /le.ɾəɹ/.
  • Like most Filipinos, she uses an /aɪl/ ending (“futile”).
  • There is a tendency to use /d/ for initial /ð/ (“then”).
  • Her primary stress in “penicillin” is on the fourth/last syllable, contrasting with RP and GenAm (stress on the third) and the more typical Filipino pronunciation (stress on the second).
  • Her pronunciation of “comfortable” is more GenAm or RP, which would otherwise be pronounced /kɒm.’fɒɹ.tæ.bɔl/ for most Filipinos.
  • Her pronunciation of Cavite is Anglicized, using a /v/, which would otherwise be pronounced with a /β/ in Spanish or /b/ in Tagalog.
  • Subject’s pronunciation of Tagalog “siyám” /si.jɐm/ is archaic, which would be more commonly pronounced as /ʃjɐm/ or /ʃɐm/.

COMMENTARY BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 19/05/2013

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.