Philippines 7

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 29

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/04/1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Cavite City, Cavite, Philippines

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Filipino of Tagalog ancestry

OCCUPATION: trainer/instructor

EDUCATION: college

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in Los Baños, Laguna, in her college years and has been living in the Middle East, in Qatar, since 2009.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

English was the primary medium in her college major and work experience as a language trainer/instructor. She also worked extensively with British and Indian expatriates and local Arabs for four years in the Middle East and has been living with her British partner for two years in the same region.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/05/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born on the 30th of April, 1984, um, here in Cavite City, so I grew up, I grew up here, but I moved to Los Baños, Laguna, to study, um, my degree in, in Communication Arts. I stayed there for four years, and then, after that, I worked as an instructor in Cavite State University, where, I basically, um, handled courses in, in the English language. And then, well, right now, I’m working in Qatar. I’ve been there for two years, as a technical … well, currently, I’m working as a technical assistant in an oil and gas company. But then before that, I was in the UAE where I worked as, um, as a language trainer for a facilities management company. Well, as you already know, I have a British boyfriend, so maybe, maybe because I talk to him everyday … yeah, but, but, but … there are people at work who are saying that sometimes I sound American, and sometimes I sound… there are certain words where I sound British. So, it’s … I think my accent is a mixture of everything: Filipino, yeah, Filipino, American, British. But, definitely, when I’m angry, I talk in English with a Filipino accent. [laughs]

[Counts in Tagalog:] Isá, dalawá, tatló, apat, limá, anim, pitó, waló, siyám, sampû. [English translation: One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten.]

[Reads idiomatic expressions from Fe Maria C. Arriola’s The Body Book, The Geography of the Filipino Body:] Kulay rosas na labì (rose-colored lips), labing parang binabad sa sukà (lit. “as if stewed in vinegar” i.e. pale lips), may gatas pa sa labì (lit. “milk is still on one’s lips” i.e. young and immature; lacks judgment), labián o ngusuán (lit. “to lip” i.e. to snob or depreciate), kagát-labì (lit. “bitten lip” i.e. a warning to be careful of what one says), matulis ang ngusò (lit. “sharply extended upper lip” i.e. catty), makapál ang labì (lit. “thick lipped” i.e. a gossip), ngusong baboy (lit. “pig’s snout” i.e. one with prominent upper and lower lips like a pig’s snout).

TRANSCRIBED BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/07/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

The subject was born in Cavite City, former capital of Cavite province, a historic city once known for being the point of entry and departure for Spanish galleons in the 16th century and during the Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade. The city occupies a hook shaped peninsula where the province gets its name. (Cavite is an Hispanic pronunciation of kawit, the Tagalog word for “hook.”) Cavite City is also one of the few places in the Philippines that developed a Spanish creole called Chavacano.
The subject’s accent of English is heavily influenced by American English, having majored in Communication Arts in one of the country’s top universities and having been an English language instructor for many years. Her accent is typical of educated professionals of her age.
In the full interview, the subject talks about her experiences working extensively with non-Anglophone foreigners and locals in the Middle East whose knowledge of English are limited. She speaks of having to un-Americanize her speech at certain times, so she might be understood more clearly.
There were also some instances in the full interview that revealed a slight Southern British influence on her English, evidenced by several words under the THOUGHT lexical set (such as “talk” and “walk”).
Like many Tagalogs who study/work or have studied/worked in Manila, she subconsciously switches between two accents depending on whom she speaks with or where she is: her regional Tagalog accent and the standard accent of Tagalog spoken in Manila.
Other characteristics:
  • The subject has a very faint glottal stop after a final or medial /t/, which you can hear in “veterinary” and “lot,” which could be attributed to her exposure to British English through her partner and colleagues.
  • She also releases her medial /t/ in words like “letter,” instead of using a flapped [r] (as in General American) or an unreleased /t/ (as in a typical Filipino accent). She, however, uses a slight flapped [r] in “beautiful.”
  • She uses the General American pronunciation of “duke” /duːk/, but a British pronunciation of “tune” /ʧuːn/ and “futile” /fjuː.taɪl/, common among many Filipinos of her age who were introduced to a more “integrated” albeit inconsistent English education system.
  • Her pronunciation of “talk” /tɔːk/ with a long open [o] reveals a British influence.

COMMENTARY BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/07/2013

The archive provides:

Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.

  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.