Poland 4

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: N/A

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Ukraine

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Ukrainian/white

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born in the Ukraine and attended university in Warsaw. Prior to this recording, she had lived in Australia for 15 years, where she worked as a dentist.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject speaks Polish, Russian, English and Ukrainian.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Geraldine Cook

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/07/2006

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

OK, my story will be short, ’cause, uh, it was long time ago [laughs]. So when I came to Australia, it wasn’t like coming from Poland straightaway, so we have to go through another country, which was Greece. It was beautiful country, but not for migrants. It was very hard time for me and for my family, and we didn’t have the job, we didn’t have the money, and it was very hard [laughs]. So, my son was born there, and, uh, after that whole struggling, we came to this beautiful country, Australia.

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: Faith Harvey

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/07/2008

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject has some distinctive features similar to other Polish subjects, but she has more frontal articulation and more consistency with vowel sounds, particularly the ER sound. Also note:  AE is elongated; end consonant “s” in plural is unvoiced; R is retroflex; OH is elongated in words like job and odd; i becomes ee, as in kit; u (short), as in foot, becomes lengthened; t is quite dentalized; and there is an Australian influence in words like palm and tune, which tend to have quite a bit of tuning on the first vowel. Overall, consonants are fairly light, e.g., beautiful (in her story), which almost becomes a d. Also, in the word “Australia,” the first vowel sound is realized as OW.

COMMENTARY BY: Geraldine Cook

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/07/2006

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.