Saskatchewan 5

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 45

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1955

PLACE OF BIRTH: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: office manager

EDUCATION: high school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:  N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Susan Stackhouse

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/05/2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

What just happened this weekend?  Hmm.  My first-born son got married and, um, we got to experience the joy and the — and the emotion of letting go and watching him embrace a new bride who we really love.  Um, the unique thing about the wedding was that Cory took it upon himself to write the music and perform at his own wedding, which we were wondering how that would all pan out for him emotionally, but he pulled it off and he got his groomsmen playing their instruments with him and serenaded his bride down the aisle.  Cause he was given piano lessons.  We — he begged to, uh, stop, so after his grade six, we said if you got your grade six, you can quit.  He had taken, I don’t know, five years of, of guitar as well and put them both down.  And then one day he picked them up and it really did pay off.  And he plays drums really well.  He, he pays, he plays — he can play anything.  But, um, yeah, it was neat.  It was really neat.  And I don’t know whether you knew that the bride never heard those words before.  Did I tell you that?  So in rehearsal, he played the guitar, but, um, she never got to hear what he was going to be singing to her.  I think she heard them in the moment.  And she — I think she was.  And as she — as she approached — as she approached, she was about to lose it.  I was losing it.  I, personally, was losing it.  But he kept winking at her and smiling at her [laughs] and getting her to lighten up.  So, yeah, it was good.  I knew he was a man the day that he came in and at the height of all stress levels when all her whole family was here and just so much to do and so many people and so much pressure.  And he came in and he said, “All I want is to make her happy.  And I don’t care what happens on her day.  I don’t care if we’re late to do this or that or whatever.  She is going to have the day of her life.”  And I thought, “Yep, you’re going to make it.”

TRANSCRIBED BY: John Wright

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/08/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject is the mother of Saskatchewan 4 and the wife of Saskatchewan 3. She is working with the narrow pitch range that is evident in the previous four Saskatchewan samples. There is an example of Canadian Raising (mid-central starting point when the following consonant is voiceiess) with the words “high,” “strikes,” “white light,” and “lighten.” Some medial [t]s are turned into [d]s, as in “beaudiful,” and some are glottallized, as in “apparently,” and “pot of gold.” There is glottal stopping, in the initial position, on words beginning with a vowel sound. The [r] is strong and some [g]s are dropped from -ing endings, as in “getting; her to lighten up.” In this example, it’s “jist” instead of “just,” and the pronunciation of the word “got” is more open than that of “gut” typically used in Canadian speech. Of interest is the use of “the” (thuh) instead of “thee” when the word following begins with a vowel. Examples of this can be heard in “the emotion,” “the unique,” and “down the aisle.”

COMMENTARY BY: Susan Stackhouse

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/05/2000

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

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