Scotland 25

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 21

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 16/02/1996

PLACE OF BIRTH: Edinburgh, Scotland

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian/Scottish

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: bachelor’s degree

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She was born and raised in Edinburgh, and has lived there ever since. However, at the time of this recording, she was a one-semester exchange student in the United States.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: none

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Samantha Preshaw (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 31/03/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

OK, so just before I went to America, my dog Penny — she’s a British Bulldog, and she’s the tiniest little bulldog you’ve ever seen; she’s so small — em, but she got pregnant with another bulldog man dog [laughs]; you know what I mean. Em, and she got pregnant, so when I went away to America, em, she ended up having her puppies. But before she had them, the vet told my mom to expect four puppies at the most because that’s what she could see; like that’s what they could see, so my mom had prepared for four little puppies to come along, but instead when Penny gave birth, she gave birth to eleven puppies, which was not four, quite a bit more than four; em, yeah, so that was crazy. And, em, I didn’t get to see them; I was so gutted that I didn’t get to meet all these puppies and be part of it, em, but I got Snapchats and, em, FaceTime by my family and got to look at all the puppies that way, but you know it wasn’t the same. But, my mom said from the beginning that she was just going to keep one little puppy, em, and obviously our own dog, Penny — we’d be keeping her. Then she was going to sell all the rest, but my mom got a lot more attached than I think she thought she was going to, and I think she actually wanted to keep three puppies in the end; like there was three she wanted she was li- — there was one puppy that was like the runt of the litter, and, em, my mom was like so scared that this puppy was going to die, and she did everything she could to make sure she was going to live. So my mom go so attached that she was like, “There’s no way I can like I can sell this puppy; like I’m too attached.” Then there was another one that my sister and my stepdad got attached to; em, my mom also loved him. Trevor: That’s its name now. Em, so, yeah, they got attached to him, and they couldn’t let him go. And then my mom got attached to another little puppy. I can’t remember what they named him. Em, but she loved him as well, and she wanted to keep three, but I think everyone was like, “No, two maximum. You can only keep two puppy — like we need — two dogs is all we can have, OK, all we can deal with; we cannot keep three of these puppies and the orig- like our own dog, Penny.” Em, so my mom kept two puppies: a little white one called Betty, and she was the one that was the runt of the litter, and she — oh, she’s so cute, em, and she’s really small as well like her mom, em, not as small, but she’s still like a really small for a bulldog. Em, and then we also kept Trevor, the one that my sister and my stepdad loved. Em, and he is just the funniest little thing ever. So I got — when i came back, they were still little puppies and I got to meet those ones, em, and they’re just the cutest little things, but they’re also very lazy …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Samantha Preshaw (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 31/03/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

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