Sichuan 5

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 17

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 31/01/1999

PLACE OF BIRTH: Zigong, Sichuan Province

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Han Chinese

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION:

Subject was in her first year of undergraduate studies in college when recorded.

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

At the time of this recording, she had been living in the United States for two and a half years. (She lived in Humboldt, California, for two years as as a high school exchange student before beginning college, and then the last six months in Ashland, Oregon.)

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: none

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/12/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Zigong. Ah, it’s a city in Sichuan Province. And I played the piano when I was 5 years old ’cause my parents insist me to play it ’cause they think I would like it. They told me I asked them to buy me a piano when I was 5 after I — the school — I from — after I finished school from kindergarten. So they got me a piano; then I started to learning it.

And my dad is a police. My mom is a offic- officer in a department of Chinese resources. And then when I get into high school, I started learning, um, the different cultures. Then I got interested in a, a — be an exchange student to come to America. So I decided to come here and study here in two years in California: Humboldt. And, uh, this is my third year. I went back to China for um, uh, two times now during summer and had fun with family. And then now coming back for, uh, college. And I’m studying in music: piano major. And also I’m studying, uh, gonna start business major next term, and I hope it’s gonna be fun for me to stay here and enjoying this culture here.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/01/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

  • The vowel in the “kit” lexical set tends to change to [i]: “kit, itchy, unsanitary, de.” Further, I observe the vowel in the word “treatment” changes to [I] as in “kit.” This does not seem to be a consistent truth but perhaps a “reverse error” in relation to the sound shift noted above.
  • The speaker is quite proficient some of the time with many consonants requiring retroflex of the tongue tip. [l, t, d, n] are often produced very clearly. This is, however, inconsistent, and at times those same consonants become unclear or are not fully formed. The position of the consonant within a word does not seem to be a determining factor in this point. Take, for example, the consonants in the following words: learning, even (final consonant is unclear/not fully formed), required, and treat.
  • The vowel in “foot” tends to shift to [u].
  • In the word “played” [eɪ], the vowel shifts to [aɪ].
  • [θ] does not consistently change in this speaker, but one will occasionally hear the consonant change to [s] as in “with.”
  • Bright [l] is executed clearly for the most part, but note that in instances where a dark [l] is used, there is not actual contact between the tongue tip and the alveolar ridge. For example, the words: “able, hold, old, told.”
  • In the word “millionaire,” the [lj] combination is replaced with [nj].

COMMENTARY BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/01/2017

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

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