Somalia 1

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.



BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 42

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/06/1972

PLACE OF BIRTH: Bardera, Somalia

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Somalian

OCCUPATION: Student

EDUCATION: undergraduate degree

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has spent the last 18 years in the United States.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Stephanie Wilborn (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/04/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Um, I’m originally from Somalia, which is part of the African continent, the east African continent. It’s also called the “Horn of Africa.” I, I, was born in Bardera, Somalia — grew up there, immigrated here 18 years ago. Pretty much I immigrated because there was a war, uh, a clan-based the civil war in Somalia, so. Well, other than growing up, um, in a different environment than where I am right now, most of, um, my school-age years was spent in school, and then as soon I became a teenager, the country erupted into a civil war, so I don’t have much of anything to tell you other than something horrible that happened in the war, other stuff like that. Well, I am looking forward to, um, getting my degree, probably going back there and helping the impoverished populations in Africa pretty much be someone who is useful to society.

I am a Muslim, so the dress code where I come from and here are two different; the foods are different, cultural basically, traditions and cultures are different, and so, yeah, there’s a huge disparity from between where I came from and here, so, and then here it’s more Westernized than from where I come from it’s a third world country an- and that has something to do with it too – the vast differences. Our food has more spices than it is in the United States, and so when rice is made we a-add some herbs to it, natural herbs; we, um, basically have a food that is basically a combination of rice and beans, and then we have something called chapati, um, and then what else? What else? We have samosa, injera, which is also made of like sort a like tortilla, but it’s for breakfast, um, yeah. Well, I miss all those, by the way. The cultural differences between here and where and the United States and Somalia, where I come from, it’s a lot different, and it takes a lot for someone to assimilate, so it’s not an easy thing to do; it’s not easy for anyone to get rid of their accent. I love keeping my accent, but, ya know, people will say, “Oh you’ve been here for this s-long, this number of years; why is your accent?” And I-I say first of all I-I don’t want to get rid of it, and second, um, I, it kind of reminds me of my background. I have not had an experience of anyone telling me to or encouraging me to get rid of it, no, nobody does that anyway.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Stephanie Wilborn (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/04/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.