South Carolina 2

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 57

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1944

PLACE OF BIRTH: Columbia, South Carolina

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: professor

EDUCATION: Ph.D.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject, who was raised in Columbia, South Carolina, also lived in Kingston, Jamaica; Annotto Bay, Jamaica; and San Diego, California.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Erica Tobolski

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/07/2001

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

You know, the University of South Carolina has a, uh, a very long and interesting relationship with the people of South Carolina. When it was created, it was one of the first public universities in the United States. And in its charter the legislature said that it was in — the business of legislature was to educate the young people of the state, which was fairly unusual in, uh, in 1801, in 1800, in 1801, when this university was founded. Over the years, uh, since it had been begun as a liberal arts college for the sort of elite children of planters, uh, uh, the university began to run into difficulty because such a large proportion of the state, uh, were small farmers and people who had little use for the wealthy planters. And so with the, after the Civil War, uh, an effort was made to change the direction of the university, and finally, um, a separate university that was founded to, to, um, educate the children of, uh, of ordinary people — Clemson University — was begun. And the idea was that at this — at this elite, uh, liberal arts college, people learned things that weren’t very useful to them, whereas at the agricultural college they could learn things they really needed, like agriculture. Since then, there’s, uh — since that time in 1890, there’s been, uh, a split in the state, ongoing rivalry between the two universities and some people have very strong beliefs about those universities. My aunt sent all of her children to Clemson because she believed that at the university people were very immoral — that men and women slept together, and, and men and women even consumed spiritus liquors, to which she was very opposed. Um, all of her children went to Clemson — I don’t know that it [laughs] — it had any, uh, moral value for them at all, but for a great many people across the state, those two views — one a belief in, in sort of the value and virtue of the land and practical life, and the other, uh, a, a belief in, um, in, in the liberal arts and that kind of learning — uh, those two attitudes very much, uh, explained the divide in feeling about universities in South Carolina. …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Sandra Lindberg

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/04/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech. In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list). The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.