Syria 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 24

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 06/06/1991

PLACE OF BIRTH: Damascus, Syria

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Syrian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: pursuing undergraduate degree

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She has lived her entire life in Damascus, Syria, except for the past three years when she has lived in Iowa City, Iowa, in the United States.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Marina Bergenstock

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/01/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

So three years ago, I was back in Syria, living with my parents. I was a senior in college, and I really had a perfect life, great friends, great house, and everything was just great. I was very happy. Then, when the war started, I had to flee outside Syria and come to America. I was alone and I was scared. I didn’t speak English very well. I had to learn the conversation and how to do a conversation with people. Uh, I registered some classes; um, I took some classes in college. I start speaking to people. I got a job as a cashier, so I had to learn how to deal with people and how to talk to them and how to start a conversation with them in English. And that’s how I learned English, under pressure, actually. And after that, I start getting better; I start getting straight A’s in my classes — it was really great for me. It was a really great experience because it changed my life. It’s changed my perspective, and it made me a better person and a stronger person than I thought I would ever be. Um, now I have some friends here. I wish I can go back to Syria and see my family there, but it’s still something I can’t do because of the war. I can’t go in; no one can go out. And, um, and I think that one day I can go back to Syria, see my friends and my university and everyone that I love, and I can see my parents. And I think that, um, I miss my cat, too, cause I had a cat in Syria which, which — his name was, uh, Haifa, and he was a great cat.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 21/02/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Some features of the subject’s speech:

  • t and d are dentalized.
  • The liquid “u” is in use.
  • The speaker explodes [g] at end of -ing word (e.g., long, liking).
  • The dark [ l ] (e.g., normally) is present.
  • The speaker tends to tap [r] when it is between two vowels (e.g., Sara) but occasionally will use a hard [r].
  • The diphthong [oʊ] (e.g., stroking, no) tends to switch to [ɒ].

Also, the speaker tends to upward inflect many of her thoughts. And her speech tends to sit in the back of the mouth.

COMMENTARY BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 21/02/2016

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.