Texas 14

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 54

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1949

PLACE OF BIRTH: Beaumont, Texas

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: sales

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in Traverse City, Michigan, from age 8 to 10. He has lived in Texas since 1959, in various cities such as Austin, Pasadena and Bellaire.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Lee Sterling III

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/07/2003

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

… one house in Beaumont, pretty well all the way, and then we moved to Pasadena a few months in ’53. Then we came back to Beaumont, and about ’55, we left Beaumont and went to Traverse City, Michigan. They didn’t like Southerners; they were all Yankees. They made fun of my accent. They didn’t eat chicken, didn’t eat no fried chicken at all. And my mother would whenever my cub scouts would meet, my cub scout group, they’d ask my mother if she was going to have chicken, because one time she made the mistake of feeding them fried chicken, and then from then on they thought that was all we ate. And they were always going to call their mothers and not go home and eat at Mrs. Sterling’s house, because they wanted to eat her fried chicken. I lived in Michigan with my two sisters, Patsy and Susie, and we took care of a hotel; my great uncle had a owned a hotel in Traverse City, Michigan, about a four-story hotel on the main drag of town. And my grandmother ran the hotel for him, and mother periodically was ill many times when she was in the 50s. And so during one of these times, Momee, my grandmother, said “Look, let’s everybody move to Michigan, and we’ll take care of everybody up there,” and that’s what we did. We went to school, started school in 1957, there in Michigan. And the girls took care of the hotel, cleaning up and doing the stuff that needed to be done to run the hotel. And Momma worked there too. And then, I don’t know, in 1959 we came back, so I guess we was there from ’50 somewhere ’57, maybe early ’57, spring ’57 all the way through the spring of ’59, which seemed like a lot longer than two years, but it was I guess just two years. And then we went to Austin, Texas. Stayed there from ’59 til ’60, ’61 I think, and then we went to Pasadena, Texas. And I was in Pasadena during Hurricane Carla, which would have been September of 1961. And then I stayed in Pasadena all the way through til about 1972, moved to Bellaire, Texas. I was 22 years old then.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Lee Sterling III

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/07/2003

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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