Utah 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 31

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/12/1979

PLACE OF BIRTH: Salt Lake City, Utah

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: some college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was in the military for eight years, serving in Italy, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Other than that, he has spent most of his life in Mt. Pleasant and Springville, Utah.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: John Graham

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/10/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I had malaria; that was an interesting experience. I spent eight days, just being sick every time I ate or drank any water; fell out of a guard tower, I was passing out, so they put me uh, on a cot in a bunker, and, uh, my job was to rest until we went back to town. ‘Cause we were three hours out from the nearest base. Driving. And by helicopter, ironically. The nearest military facility, by helicopter, was three hours and the nearest base period was three hours by vehicle. So I was just waiting for time to pass so I could go back to the main base so we could get to check in with the medics and stuff. The medic — we had one medic who was a PFC he’d come check but there was nothing abnormal. 101 fever, sinus arrhythmia, irregular heart beat stuff. Just everybody had that, cause we were in the middle of the desert, it was just kind of expected. So, everybody, you know — I didn’t stand out as anything severe until I left the shade, because I was always in the shade, and I went and I suddenly felt better one day, and went to take a shower and I couldn’t wash the grime off. And the showers like water bottles in a bucket with holes stabbed in it, so you get this drip and I just figured inadequate facilities, therefore I couldn’t get clean. So I scrub scrubbed right out of bottled water, and I couldn’t get it off. So I’m walking back and I felt good and the uh, radio operator was like, he’s like, “Dude you look yellow, maybe you should go see the medic.” And I was like, “Uh? What are you talking about — yellow? Whatever.” So I look in the mirror, and uh, and I was yellow. So I went to the medic and I was like, “Hey Doc! Look me in the whites of the eyes and tell me I’m gonna live!” and he said, “You’re getting medevaced.” And so they called for the helicopter, cause apparently my liver had failed so I was jaundiced. And, uh, so they shipped me back to Kandahar, and they had to refuel halfway there so there’s three helicopters, it was a Black Hawk and two Apache escorts. And so that was an expensive for taxpayers trip I’m sure, but — and then, uh when I got to Kandahar, to the surgical facility, I had a red cell blood count a two. So I was suffocating. They gave me two blood transfusions. Immediately. They like — it was, “Who is A positive?” And one of the medics starts slap—started slapping his wrist right there and uh, that was — he was — he was giving up — that was the last thing that remember before I passed out was him getting ready to give up blood, just so they could put it straight into me. And uh, so then I woke up in Germany, I guess? I, I don’t remember anything in Germany, I was in the hospital there for three week in ICU and I caused all sorts of problems. I, every time that I gained consciousness I thought I’d been captured so I would assault people and try to escape. But I’d lost like 45 pounds of muscle so I was like a sloppy wet fish and I just, flail around and slap tubes at people. So nobody really got hurt other than me. But I was just, the the pain cause I always —  when I figured that I couldn’t do anything else and I’d try to mess with the machinery, so I’d always change the settings on all my life support equipment, and everything and that … the doctors get irritated. Uh, I pulled out an A line once, I had a trach; that was fun being on a ventilator. Changing the ventilator settings is one of the things that stressed them out. The uh, interesting fact: they screw the plugs into the walls in the ICU so that you can’t pull the plug on the life support. So that’s kind of a misnomer when they say, “Pull the plug.” Cause you can’t. Cause they’re attached mechanically to the wall. And uh, but it’s, yeah, it’s interesting. And uh, let’s see. Other fun things I learned in the hospital that uh, the little green star in the green wristband mean you’re a fall hazard. So if you, uh, try to get out of bed your face is gonna meet the floor before your second foot does and then they get mad about that, too. But uh, after I got stabilized they sent me to Walter Reed in D.C. where I tried to jump off the roof of the heli— the roof of the hospital, when we got out of the helicopter. Because I thought I’d been captured again. I distinctly remember thinking, “There’s no buildings taller than two stories in Afghanistan. So I’m just gonna run and jump off this thing and get away from these guys.” So as soon as the helicopter landed I brushed them out of the way, I made like, three steps out of the helicopter before I collapsed. But I was firmly intent on jumping off the side of that building, which is seven stories to pavement or concrete. And it would have been a horrible way to end all that tax payer investment.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Andrew Hansen

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/10/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

In general, before [l], [eɪ] is changed to [ɛ], and [fleɪl] becomes [flɛl]. Final [t] after [s] is dropped.

COMMENTARY BY: John Graham

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/10/2010

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