Utah 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 19

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/03/1991

PLACE OF BIRTH: Salt Lake City, Utah

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: sophomore in college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, for two years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: John Graham

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/11/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

In Utah, I have lived — I was born here, in 1991. And I have lived on and off here since then, and I’m 19 now, so probably about, I would say 17 years, ’cause the other years I lived in Cincinnati. When I was in fourth grade, all the fourth graders always go to, um, a ski resort. And they’d learn to ski. It’s like a a thing everybody does. So everybody knows how to ski and — except for my siblings who all like to snowboard. Cause I guess snowboarding is cooler, or something, I don’t know. I don’t like snowboarding. I’m not good at it. We have really good climbing and stuff around here, which is awesome. It’s all about outdoor sports. Which I’m not a big fan, but rock climbing, for sure. Um, it’s a sport — like a hobby I got into like a few years ago and there’s really good canyons — rock canyon over here, in like, Provo area. And last March me and my friends got a whole bunch of new gear and so we decided, “Hey! Let’s go rock climbing!” And so, we’re — started climbing up the wall, and I’m like, halfway up, and it starts snowing. And I was like, “Great. Thanks Utah.” And I kept climbing and I get up to the top of the ledge and there’s a cave. And in the cave are mountain goats. And I go, “OK, belay down, I’m getting off this.” I was — those goats were scary. They all have horns and they’re scary. But — I am, I don’t know. I was afraid that they would like, try and bite me and I’d fall off the ledge. Even though I was like, still hooked to the rope and everything. No. No bueno. I was super afraid that they would like, try to ram me, and like, I don’t know. Pain. I was afraid of that. Fear of pain. I think that’s fair to say. You know those days where it’s like, it snows one — in the morning and it’s super cold and the rest of the day is super hot and you’re like, “Man, weird.” So, I, I — in my Saturn I have a sunroof. And, I’m driving to his house and I’m like, “It’s so hot.” And I have my windows down, so I decided to open my sunroof. And there’s snow on top of my car so snow just comes into my car and once again I was surprised, trying to figure out how this happened. And the snow — I’m like, scooping snow out of my car, close the, the thing, I ca- … even though there’s snow already everywhere. I was just scooping it out the windows, people were laughing at me, I was throwing snowballs out of my car. It was just, a very funny story.

TRANSCRIBED BY: John Graham

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/11/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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