Washington 3

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 40

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/04/1973

PLACE OF BIRTH: Yakima, Washington (central part of the state)

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: Fourth-grade teacher of Spanish Immersion

EDUCATION: MA in bilingual education

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has lived in Renton and Bellevue, Washington, and also in Pachuca, Hidalgo, Mexico.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Nina Zendejas

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/12/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I’m from Yakima, Washington, and, um, I’ve lived over in Bellevue now for about eight years. Um, I remember since it’s Christmas season, I remember, um, several traditions that my family had in, in eastern Washington, one of which was going to the, uh, up Chinook Pass to get, uh, Christmas tree, uh, with our dogs. We had some Weids and, and Huskies and, and so we’d go up and get our Christmas tree in the snow, and, um, spend the day there. Um, another Christmas tradition we used to have was my mom always made us, um, um, oyster stew, which, I guess was an Irish tradition, and so every Christmas eve we would eat ice-oyster stew … ah, which, none of my brothers, nor myself, cared for very much. Um, but we’re forced to eat it, and so. Uh, that was the one Christmas tradition that we didn’t enjoy so much, but, um, I have many, um, special memories from living in the country, in, in the outskirts of, of Yakima, um, living in the orchard country and, and spending Christmas there with lots of snow. Um, something I know my daughters, uh, would love to have here in western Washington, but I don’t remember very many Christmases without snow. Um, over in, in my childhood. Um, and uh, but I tend to think about those things, yeah, as an adult, and sharing Christmas with my daughters now and how I spent Christmas and try to share as much as that with my own daughters, but now that my wife — my wife is from Mexico — we have different traditions in our house on Christmas Eve. We eat bacalao, which is a cod dish, so, um, girls are getting used to eating that now. And so, no more oyster stew, which is something— we’re stepping up, we’re going to cod.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Nina Zendejas

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/04/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.