Wisconsin 7

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: N/A

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1966

PLACE OF BIRTH: Edgerton, Wisconsin

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: high school counselor

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject speaks of relatives who seemed to have Norwegian accents, even though they were raised in Wisconsin. This speaks to the fact that this part of the country saw heavy immigration from Scandinavia.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: N/A

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I’m from Wisconsin, the south-central – probably more south than central – part of Wisconsin, Edgerton. And there were about 4,300 people that lived there when I was growing up. Um, a lot of people telling a lot of stories all the time, talking really fast. Lot of people talking like, well, actually my relatives, that grew up in Cambridge, I couldn’t — they would come over, my older relatives, like my, my mom’s cousins, and my aunts and uncles. I wouldn’t be able to understand them at all. A couple of them talked like they just came off the boat. So, they talked like they came from Norway, but they never — they grew up right there the whole time. So I had friends from Edgerton that would talk similar to that. Just, you know, depending on what part of — if they lived in town or if they lived on a farm. And sometimes I think they were pretending that they — or, either that or they were influenced by other peoples’, um, dialects, or whatever. So, they’d be talking and all of a sudden they’d just have this accent. They’d have a — like a Norwegian accent, which I really can’t describe, but, but other than that, growing up with a small town was — everybody knew everybody else, and every time, um, every time you, uh, you’d try to get away with something, everybody else knew before you even got there, that, that you had gotten in trouble, or …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/10/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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