Afghanistan 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 48

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1959

PLACE OF BIRTH: Herat, Afghanistan

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Afghani

OCCUPATION: housewife/mother

EDUCATION: primary school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Mark Ingram and his students

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

OK.  My son asking me to say some story.  And I really, really don’t think if I have anything but except something that I gonna tell about myself.  That was in nineteen fifty … nine that I was born approximately on that year and then that was in Herat in Afghanistan.  And … and it was, I was 10 years old that I remember that life was so simple and it was … I lived at my grandmother and we never had a radio or a television or a watch or anything or clock.  So …and our alarm clock was the rooster that is around maybe five or four-thirty or something that was starting doing his “cock-a-doodle-doo.”  And then that was the grandma was start her morning.  And then around six, six-thirty, she start fire and make her tea.  And then … old little bread that we used to have, she put it in the fire to make a toast for me, which is I supposed to go to school.  And then on that time my aunt was also brooming the back yard and the front yard and all type of things in the floor.  And then my grandmother say that, “Don’t pick her up with loud noise.  Let she sleep.”  But I was waking up by the noi … the smell of little old bread that she was putting in the fire to make a toast with the sugar.  Put the … a spoon of sugar in the tea and a piece of bread that was our breakfast was very, very … But we were thankful for that and they make me ready to go to school.  And, uh, that was it.  That was our meal.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Lynn Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/02/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.