Australia 29

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 25

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 16/10/1989

PLACE OF BIRTH: United States

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Italian/Native American/black (African-American)/Australian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: enrolled in BFA

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in the United States until she was 7.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject talks about the influence of her peers on her speech.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Linda Nicholls-Gidley

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 08/05/2015

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I think my background is: My mum is Italian; um, my dad is African-American and Cherokee Indian. Um, I grew up in the States till I was 7 and then moved over to Australia, lived in Perth for like the last 18 years. Um, most of, I think, while I’m grow, whilst I was growing up, um, I was in a pr-, standard Australian speaking background. And I’ve got a lot of friends that I have grown up with as well too that are from the UK. Um, so they’ve got a variance of different accents there, and also Irish friends as well. So I’ve kind of picked up on a bit of like a London accent and an Irish accent, and I’ve decided to kind of put those into my accent, which I normally have an American, an Australian, then I have a British, and then an Irish depending on the mood. And they kind of like, flit through each other.

I’ve been living in Sydney for the last two years now. Growing up in Perth for 18 years — that was kind of interesting though, I guess, um, trying to kind of fit in with the Australian culture and sounding so different, which was hard; but the same time it was a necessity to kinda sign, sound different because it was a new thing, and it kind of got me, I guess, out of bullying. Um, so that was like a, a defense mechanism that I had so I, I could choose whether or not I wanted to use my American accent at a particular point or if I wanted to use my Australian one to fit in.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Linda Nicholls-Gidley

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/07/2015

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Notice the phrase “bowl of porridge.” The GOAT vowel is realized as the close-mid back vowel [o]. The subject then uses a rhotic vowel on the word “porridge.” Rhoticity is also evident in her unscripted speech.

Subject uses yod-dropping on the words “new,” “duke,” and “tune.”

Subject uses a glottal stop in some instances to replace final /t/. In other instances, often when the /t/ is followed by a vowel, she uses a tap /ɾ/.

COMMENTARY BY: Linda Nicholls-Gidley

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/07/2015

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.