Denmark 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 70

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1937

PLACE OF BIRTH: Skagen, Denmark

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: retired, working for Danish Consul

EDUCATION: college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has spent time in England, Peru, South Africa, and Minnesota in the United States.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Joseph Papke

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 19/12/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I grew up in Denmark’s most northern town.  It’s called Skagen.  And, umm, you have the Sea of Skagerrak on one side and, uh, uh, basically, uh you know the (Westerhaven), on the left side and there’s a, Denmark ends in a long sand pit, sand spit I should say, and because of the difference in salinity between the two seas that meet there, you have sort of waves that hit up against each other.  It’s very sandy, it’s somewhat like, uh, um, I think Cape Cod, in some aspects of Cape Cod in personality, wind, sand, uh, western bent, uh, pines that sort of don’t grow to be too tall.  And, um, so it’s rough and dramatic in some ways.  We have several sort of wandering sand dunes across a spit of land that goes from west to east, and I love it.  It’s become a very, very popular tourist place and, uh, wealthy people from all around Denmark now come and have taken the old fisherman houses and built them into sort of elegant summer homes.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Joseph Papke

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 19/12/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Some sounds to note include the labial/weak [r], as in “Perry,” “practice,” “stressed,” “mirror,” and “hurry”; leaning non-rhotic; voiced medial [t], as in “letter” and “a lot of”; [ð] toward [d] as in “there” and “the”; [θ] occasionally toward [s], as in “mouth”; and a [v]-[w] blend, as in “working,” “when,” “wiped,” “several,” and “west.”

COMMENTARY BY: Joseph Papke

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 19/12/2007

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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