England 100

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*This subject is the same as Devon History 2.

BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 86

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 22/01/1931

PLACE OF BIRTH: Plymouth (Devonport)

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: white

OCCUPATION: retired (worked as a draughtsman, among other jobs)

EDUCATION: Fellow of Royal Institute of Naval Architects

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

As a child, the subject was sent to Paignton (also in Devon) during the Second World War, where he stayed for a number of months. He was then evacuated to Penzance, Cornwall, and lived in a hostel at Marazion, Cornwall, for several years. He moved to Cape Town, South Africa, as a young man to reunite with his maternal grandfather, who was a child of 1820 settlers. He has remained in the Cape area of South Africa since then, established his own family, obtained several further qualifications, and followed diverse career paths.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The subject suffered a stroke approximately two years prior to the recording date but presents without noticeable speech and/or language disability.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Nadia Barnard

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/10/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Oh, this is a very long journey, actually, if you start from the beginning: I was born in Plymouth, or in Devonport as it was then known, and brought up in a very working-class family, and it wasn’t long before the war came. And that was a terrible time, because my school friends were killed, the home I lived in was bombed. All in all it is not full of happy memories. … And I became a draughtsman, and I worked as a draughtsman for a time, but not satisfied with that, I then, ah, opted to go to South Africa. Now there’s a long story attached to that: My grandfather was South African; he was the child of 1820 settlers. My mother instilled on me her, uh, wish to be reunited with her family, who to a large extent were Afrikaans-speaking, believe it or not. …

Plymouth Gin: It’s the best gin you can get. Gin was always supplied to ships like Sir Francis Drake and so on, because it has a very high alcohol content, which is sufficient for setting off the gunpowder. So it’s about 67 percent or some, some, some ridiculous figure. It’s very good for setting off gunpowder; it’s also very good for setting off people actually, [subject laughs] and, you — as you can probably tell, I’ve had a couple. [Subject laughs.] So there we are. And I found it just this year; it’s the first time I find it, and it — I hate to tell you it’s fifty rand [South African currency] a bottle. But, um, it brings back so many memories. There’s no gin like Plymouth Gin; it has its own flavor; it’s not like any other gin whatsoever …

[This is an abbreviated version of a longer recording. For the complete recording, see Devon History 2.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Nadia Barnard

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/10/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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