England 23

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 23

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1975

PLACE OF BIRTH: Washington, Tyne & Wear

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: white

OCCUPATION: student, actor

EDUCATION: university

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject also lived in nearby Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, for two years before moving back to Washington.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Katerina Moraitis

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 23/02/2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, I come from Washington, um, which is where she just mentioned, um, and it’s in the middle of Newcastle in Sunderland.  Um, but all my family come from Tyneside, so I’ve I’ve got what I would describe as a- a diluted Geordie accent.  Um, most people in Washington sound more Mackem than Geordie.  Um, and I’ve noticed because I was li- living in Gateshead for two years when I moved back that I don’t speak like anyone that I used to go to school with or s-s-sound like them when I’m a kind of [unclear] don’t think I sound Geordie.  Um, but Washington’s not as strong as a Sunderland accent.  Um, Washington’s, uh, the new town and it’s a bit of a shithole, it’s all council estates and stuff, uh, and it’s a strange place to live really cause I’m kind of originally from Newcastle and it’s, uh, it’s a bit of a cultural vacuum.  Um, but it’s fifty-fifty Geordies and Mackems.  Uh, Sunderland and Newcastle.  And that’s about it really.  Yeah, so I I just, um, been in Prague for two weeks with two of me mates and, uh, discovered the joys of absinthe the first week.  And, uh, quite an enlightening experience, the absinthe.  Uh, the first few nights we were drinking the Sljivovica, which is a kind of plum brandy.  And, uh, the third night we decided to drink this uh,  rather strong beer.  It was about 7 percent and then going to the absinthes.  We had about four absinthes, and then I can’t remember very much.  And then I went back to this this hostel where we were staying this in these dormitories and apparently I can’t remember even doing that.  I can’t remember anything at all.  Apparently my mates, uh, picked us off the street a few times, um, trying to fall asleep.  Uh, which is a common feature for my drunken nights out, but anyway, I decided I had to go to bed.  I va- I vaguely recall I had decided I had to go to bed.  So I took all me clothes off, um, in the corridor bar me boxer shorts and a pair of socks, right?  So I’m walking through the corridor just in me boxer shorts and socks, put me clothes somewhere and shoes, I don’t know where I put them, and I just started knocking on doors, couldn’t remember where me room was.  So I’m knocking on all these doors with only me boxer shorts and socks on asking where me room is to all these total strangers who from different parts of the world and I can’t look at [unclear], and I say I’m crazy it’s about 5 o’clock in the morning.  Um, and I’m walking around everywhere and it’s pitch black and I’m, I don’t know where I’m going, going down all these corridors and, uh, I can’t really remember anything about it but the next day the barman said that I’d gone up to the bar and walked into the actual bar area where he’s serving drinks in me boxer shorts and socks and I swear to you it was … Um, so anyway that that was the last, uh, the last of me dignity; it was all lost in Prague.  But um, I, I can’t remember much about it when people said they had seen us.  And this guy said he had came, came back about 6 in the morning after me mate had puked on his bed and left at 4 o’clock in the morning, um, to go and stay at another hostel without telling anybody, and then he let us into the room, and, uh, apparently I just turned to him, didn’t even say hello, just said where’s me room.  So he shows where the room was and I got to bed.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Brady Blevins

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/02/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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