England 26

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 19

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1980

PLACE OF BIRTH: Newcastle, Tyne & Wear

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: white

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was raised in Gatehead, Tyne & Wear.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Katerina Moraitis

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 22/09/1999

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

[Subject:] … It was very expensive. [Friend:] So, did you wear that for the wedding? [Subject:] Yeah, I got it for my cousin’s wedding. [Friend:] Mm, very nice. I don’t know what I’ll wear, ’cause I am skint [?] cheque goes in. [Subject:] So, we’ll meet in Chetty’s [?] as normal. [Friend:] If you get in. [Subject:] If I get served, without ID, because I didn’t last time I went, and I was gutted. [Friend:] And then we shall venture to the bar and find some nice men. [Subject:] My cousin got married last Saturday and it was lovely. It was very small church, which I wouldn’t have liked ’cause everybody had to, like, really like squash into the pew. And the vicar at one point said, um, my cousin’s middle name’s Michael, Stuart Michael, and at one point he said, “So, Stuart and Michael will live together in holy matrimony.” To which our side of the church burst out in hysterics. But, um, I don’t think Rachel’s parents were very impressed by the fact that we were laughing. But it was quite funny, and the vicar didn’t even know he’d said it. But, um, then the reception was in an absolutely gorgeous hotel that was by the River Thames, but like just a really small part of the River Thames. And there was another wedding there, and all their guests arrived off a barge and it was lovely. My four little cousins were bridesmaids, but two of them fell asleep by 10 o’clock in their little bridesmaids’ dresses in the corner. So, that was fairly cute. But they’re fairly cute anyway, so… [Friend:] … Bay. Um, I’ve lived in Whitley Bay since I was about 4. Um, there’s not a great deal to do in Whitley Bay, apart from drink. Um, it’s nice, quite pretty, next to Tynemouth. [Subject interjects.] The dome’s horrible, but I actually went one night during the summer for my friend’s birthday party. She had like a salsa night there. And it’s horrible, it’s next to the Spanish City, and it’s full of charvers, um, which are horrible young people who wreck Whitley Bay. Um, there’s a lot of debate going on in Whitley Bay at the moment about having, the pubs having, late licenses, ’cause the residents are unhappy about it, but the pubs are the only thing that drags tourists in. Because it did used to be quite a, a good little tourist spot, but not anymore. Um, I’d say probably Tynemouth gets more of the business now. It’s prettier. It’s full of old people …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Kevin Flynn

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/02/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject was a little nervous. She comes quite close to her natural accent. It is interesting to note that it comes across during more during her personal story than in the scripted text. The unscripted speech features a conversation between the subject and her friend (England 27).

COMMENTARY BY: Katerina Moraitis

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 22/09/1999

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