England 85

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 38

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 16/04/1972

PLACE OF BIRTH: Southampton, Hampshire

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: white

OCCUPATION: hotel manager

EDUCATION: A-Levels, college degree

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject moved to Guildford, Surrey, at age 18 and Harvington, Worcestershire, at age 21.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/08/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Um, now just to tell you about growing up in Southampton; uh, um, I was born there in 1972, which seems like a long long time ago now, and I lived in Southampton for the first eighteen years of my life; uh, we lived just near a common so it was a great place to grow up ’cause we had lots of, um, areas to play at and woods and a sports center nearby so that was great; then I went to university and that was in Guildford, which was probably, uh, eighty miles away from home, and I used to go there every term time and again I enjoyed that; there was lovely shops there, nice restaurants, so I had a good time in Guildford and each time I’d come back home to Southampton to see my parents and my sister who lived there; um, after I left university my parents then moved to Brockenhurst, which is in the New Forest, and that’s about ten miles away from Southampton but very beautiful scenery, and we used to go to the village there and there’d be donkeys walking down the street and horses in the village and that was very nice; and my sister still lives there now with my mom, so it’s a lovely place to go and visit while I’m here; um I also worked on cruise ships for about three years, and my first cruise ship I traveled all the way around the whole of the world and although I never had a day off in the six months I was there I used to get an hour off here and an hour off there, and we’d all sort of save up our hours and swap them so that you’d get a whole day off in a port at the same time, and I remember going to, um, sailing under the bridge in, um, Sydney, and that was a great adventure, really exciting, very different. And, um, just lots and lots of different things we used to see and just sailing under the bridge and seeing the opera house, and then we all sort of fought to get time off while we were there, but it wasn’t very much not enough to see very much, um, but I went around and I had a drink in the harbor and took loads and loads of photographs, and I remember we all got up at 4 o’clock in the morning just so that we’d see the view as we sailed into the harbor [unclear], and then we were just there one day and had to work for half of it, and then we sailed off somewhere else, so I didn’t see an awful lot of it and that was really good; and when I finished working on the cruise ships I went and started managing a pub, which was just outside of Stratford where I live now, and that was in a place called Triple Camden. And I did that for three years: very, very hard work, and again never got days off, so I finally decided it was better to work in a hotel, and I’ve been doing that now for the last nine years in Stratford, and started off working in the restaurant, which I really enjoyed and did a bit of conference work and in the bar and banquets, lots of weddings things like that.

TRANSCRIBED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/08/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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