Ethiopia 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 54

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 13/12/1960

PLACE OF BIRTH: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Ethiopian (exact ethnicity N/A)

OCCUPATION: university staff

EDUCATION: N/A

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Speaker moved to the United States in her 20s and has remained in Southern California ever since.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Shellie Sterling (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/11/2015

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, I came, eh, to this country in ’80, in early ’80s and right, immediately I start working in the campus, which I’m still working there, but I went from department to department. So, I’m here. I, I, I got married and have three beautiful kids, who’s very successful, and one is in medical field and two twins I have is, yeah, both of them civil engineer. They just got graduated last year and got a job with some construction agencies. So, so far we’re doing good. Coming from a very conservative country, uh, East Africa, uh, Ethiopia, and, yeah, I was born and raised in the capital city of Addis Ababa. So, um, that country pretty much very conservative, for especially woman. You know, they just, you know a little behind. A woman has to act this way; a woman doesn’t have to talk loud. So it’s kind of, uh, made it a little bit difficult for me when I came to this country, which is other way around. So, um, that’s the only problem I had early on when I came to this country but … lunch yesterday — I love tuna sandwich somehow. It’s light, and, um, I know a lot of people like, I hate it after I ate it. It’s kind of you know, at my age now, uh, kind of conscious about what I’m eating, so that’s good for me if I eat too much for lunch — it kind of, you know, makes me drowsy working after …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Shellie Sterling (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/11/2015

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.