Florida 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 18

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: actor

EDUCATION: high school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born in Philadelphia, lived in New Jersey until age 3, and spent most of the rest of his life in Miami, Florida. He had been working in New York for the six months before the recording was made.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

His mother is from New Jersey, and his father is from Colorado.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: N/A

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Um, when I was like 2 or 3, I was a big fan of, um, “The Wonder Years,” and I always wanted to be Fred Savage. So I woul- told my mom from the time I was like two that I wanted to be an- famous actor. And, uh, she thought it was just like a phase that I was going t- through, so she didn’t really think anything of it, but by the time I was 5, and I kept, you know, saying I wanted to be an actor, she finally signed me up for acting camp at, uh, Actors’ Playhouse, when they were still in Kendall. And, um, I took the class for like two months, and then they auditions for “The Nerd.” And, uh, I auditioned, and I got the part, and I had a great time. David Aristico [spelling?] was the director, and my mom had, uh, got divorced like a year and a half before. And like, by the last show, they had started dating, and now he’s my stepdad. And, uh, then after that, I continued to work in the area. I did “Pippin” here. And I, uh, then I did “Damn Yankees” and, uh, continued to work regionally at Coconut Grove Playhouse and Actors’ Playhouse. And then when I was 12, I decided that I wanted to take a big chance, and I auditioned for “Les Mis,” at the Jackie Gleason Theatre. And there was like 3,000 kids, and I was number 2,998, so I was there from 7 in the morning till like 7 at night. And I went in and I did my thing, and at the end of the audition they said, “Go get your mom. How would you like to move to New York?” And so I, um, went and got my mom. And, we had just moved back into our house after the hurricane. We didn’t lived in our house for three years, ’cause Andrew pretty much destroyed our, our house, and we were having trouble with con- contractors, so we had just moved back, and my mom wasn’t really optimistic about, you know, leaving the house after we had just moved back in. But she said yes, and they said, “Well, we have a couple more people to see, and if we decide to give you the part, we’ll call you in the next day or so.” I didn’t go to school the next day. I stayed by the phone. And, uh, no one called. So, two weeks later, I was taking a nap, which I never do, and they called and said that I got the part. And then two weeks later I left to New York, and I did the show for six months. And that’s pretty much it.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/10/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject is an 18-year-old, Caucasian male, who was born in Philadelphia,
lived in New Jersey until age 3, and spent the rest of his life in Miami,
Florida. His mother is from New Jersey and his father is from Colorado.
The subject has a definitive tension of the tongue retracting backward and
upward. This helps create the very definitive /ɰ/ for all consonant R sounds
and R-colored vowels. The intervocalic /t/ becomes a /d/. The /l/ is
pronounced / ɫ/ with a dark quality from pressing it hard into the alveolar
area. There is a strong nasalization to the vowels next to nasal consonants.
Final consonants are often dropped.

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.