Florida 4

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 18

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Tampa, Florida

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: Subject was a beginning theatre student when recorded.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Although a theatre student, subject has not worked on changing her voice or speech. Her mother is also from Florida, but her father is from New York.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: N/A

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

OK, so, when I was 6 years old, I was playing the Dormouse in Alice in Wonderland at this acting-camp production thing, ’cause I always played furry animals in productions, for some reason. First I was Toto. And, so in – we’re doing this, uh, the tea party scene, with Alice and the Mad Hatter and all that stuff. And we had this platform that we would roll out. Hard, ridiculous platform. And we had made the teapot, out of a trash can that we cut the back out of, and we painted to look like all pretty and stuff. So I just went around to the back of it whenever I had to get in. And so I do my solo number, where I get to like — hit the Mad Hatter over the head with a flyswatter and get to mispronounce a lot of words. It’s really, it was really neat. And, um, just as I’m getting back in to the teapot from the back, I fall, off the table, onto the corner of the platform, banging the side of my head ridiculously hard, and everyone starts cracking up. And poor Alice: I don’t even remember her name or anything, but, you know, everyone’s like panicking onstage, and poor Alice was trying to lift me up but at the same time she’s like cursing the audience under her breath, telling them to shut up. You know, so she was like, “Shut up! Shut up!” And she’s like pushing me down on every off-beat, without even realizing it. So I’m going up and down after I just got my head hit. And finally, like, they get me up, and they’re all like, “Uhh-uhhh.” And they just kind of like shoo me off the stage, and everyone’s cracking up ’cause they thought it — I don’t know, some people thought it was part of the story and some people didn’t. And I’m walking off like holding my head and crying and everything. And my mom’s waiting in the wings. And my brother was playing a playing card, so he was waiting back there also. And they’re shoving ice packs like under my hood, to try to numb it or whatever. And I’m sittin’ there cryin’. And I was telling my mom and all the, the director and everyone; I was like “I’m sorry I left the stage. I know the show should’ve gone on.” And crying and just going on and on. And they’re like, “It’s OK, you’re only 6 years old. You’re allowed to leave the stage.” And like, to this day, I am still so mad at myself for walking off that stage. I’m like, “I should have stayed on stage. I should have kept going.” And my mom always yells at me. And she’s like, “You were 6 years old! Let it go. It’s OK.” But, that’s my, like — the trauma for my life, is that I did not stay on stage and I was the Dormouse when I was 6 years old.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/09/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Notice the usage of the consonant /ɰ/ (hard velar-placed R sound), even to
the point that it is used for R-colored vowels, the /ɫ/ sound, and usage of the
/ɑ/ sound generally for the low back vowels. There is slight nasal quality to
vowels (especially around nasal consonants). There is a downward inflection
pattern ending sentences with some drop off in vocal energy.

COMMENTARY BY: N/A,  Unicode trans. Dylan Paul

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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