Germany 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 28

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1972

PLACE OF BIRTH: Lüneburg, Germany

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: German (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: graduate student

EDUCATION: university

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She lived in Kiel for six years, and has traveled in Italy, France, Greece, England and the United States. (See transcription for specific cities.)

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Her first foreign language was Latin.  She learned English from native Germans, so her accent isn’t affected by American or British dialects.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Chloe Ritter

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

OK, um, I was raised in Lüneburg; it’s next to Hamburg, and, um, then I went to Kiel; I studied at Kiel for six years – the last six years – before I came to Kansas. And, um, yeah, I traveled, um, throughout my life. I was in Italy, and France; in, um, Greece with my parents, almost … And I went – once I went to England, um, to – what is it, um, yeah, next to York, so, Humberside there. And I was – actually I was two times in – in America. [In] 1991, I was in Baltimore and Washington D.C., and I visit a friend. And ’86, it was my first year, I went to New York to visit also a friend of mine. I was so little, it was a different impression I had, really. But, um, yeah this was actually my staying abroad, so to speak. It was in the seventh class, so to speak, I mean it’s different from America, for sure. And, um, my first foreign language was Latin, so it was my first one. And then I took … English. And it was, actually I had, um, yeah, I had always German teachers. So they – no – native Germans, not native speakers. Um, yeah, as well as at university, so it was the same. I think seven or eight years in a row I was in Greece. So because my father was a Latin and Greek teacher. And, um, I really enjoyed that. So we had a little, really, fish – fisher – fisher village I would say, you know, and it’s really, it was the island Kos [spelling?]. So it was pretty. It was 1770s [sic] and, um, no – 80s more, and I really enjoyed that as well as, um, to go with my parents to, um, yeah – is it, um, Saint Mont Michel [sic], so, in France. OK, I, actually I take French here, so, I also liked it. I had it ten, um, ten years ago at school for two years, so … And I can refresh it here. It’s great. So I love it. When I came here I got to know at the airport a German – um, a German – an American, um, woman here. She works for the Alumni association center. And she said, “Oh, well, please bring me something, you know, when you come back from Germany.” And I bought a book. And she was totally impressed with the, the houses. And what is so typical of Germany, of Luenborg; Luenborg is an old – I don’t know the word – salt, salt town, you know? So it was very rich in the Middle Ages. And they have really this brick stone houses with the facades. … In German, it’s gieble [spelling?]. OK, and it’s really really famous, and it’s, it’s beautiful, actually.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Chloe Ritter

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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