Guatemala 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 51

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1957

PLACE OF BIRTH: Guatemala City, Guatemala

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Guatemalan (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: housewife

EDUCATION: high school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was living in Orange County, California, in the United States, at the time of this recording.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject learned English at age 17.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Erica Sinner-Schweikart (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/11/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

When my sisters and I, in Guatemala, were, uh, young we had a pet, a goat pet, that we named Bleble, because you know the noise and he was uh small and we all had a really good time with it, but when it grew up and it started to be trouble. So one time um my sister, you know the goat was laying in the way and she was gonna go over it and just like when she stepped to ya know the other side of the goat the goat a stood up and so my sister was hanging there from one side to another. It was you know we had a lot of good nice uh stories or memories of that time. Why we had a goat? My grandparents got it, this little, somebody gave it to them and they didn’t think they were going to have it for a long time, but end up that we kids were so attached to it that they didn’t get rid of it so. Um, we lived in this area where there were no houses around, there were some but further away ya know so we could take the bleble, the goat, for um to grass you know grassing around because there was grass all around the house so, but sometimes we were young, very young, I was probably was like 7 or 8 and my sister probably was 4, somewhere around there, 4 or 5. So we would just leave it out and forget and then my grandparents would say where is that, the goat, and oops and it was around time 8 p.m. or so and the goat was still out. We had dogs as pets also. I remember Perla means pearl because her eyes were very nice and clear and he was brown, all brown with the clear eyes, it was a pretty dog and um and my grandmother called her Perla  and this dog was so into everything in the house to and I remember once my sister left, one of my sisters I shouldn’t say mine because I have three so one of them left fifty, in Guatemala they used to have bills for fifty cents and you know the bills are all different colors and this one was brown so my sister left her bill on the bed and the dog came into the house and he was just laying in the bed and ate her bill. He started to play with it and you know he probably wasn’t grown enough he was a puppy so they like to play and so my sister is like where is my money I left it here and we started to look for it and we couldn’t find it and we would never think of the dog eating the bill if he wasn’t because he had a little piece right here hahaha by the side of the mouth and then we knew you know. Otherwise we would still be looking for it.  Yeah. it’s just memories I have.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Erica Sinner-Schweikart (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/11/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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