Hungary 4

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 50

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/12/1960

PLACE OF BIRTH: Bodroghalom, Hungary

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Hungarian

OCCUPATION: pharmacist

EDUCATION: graduate school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She has lived in Sátoraljaújhely (14 years), Budapest (seven years), and Szeged (two years), all in Hungary. She then lived for two years in Pasadena, California, in the United States, and then settled in Valencia, California, in the 1980s.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

She learned English when she was 25 years old in Hungary; at her school they wanted her to learn two foreign languages. When she moved to California, she took a six-week course in English.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Delilah Kujala (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/11/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, I came to this country from a place where, besides major political, um, disaster, no other natural disaster ever happened.  In 1994, I believe so it happened the Northridge earthquake.  When, um, I was planning to go to work very early, like 4 o’clock in the morning because it was a holiday, a school holiday.  And then I was gonna go with the children somewhere to have fun, after work, coming home early.  But somehow I was too tired and I decided not to do it.  And I was very tired, sleeping, when my daughters started to shake me up. Their “Mommy! Mommy!  It’s an earthquake!”  Finally, I managed up from the bed.  We were trying to go down the stairs, but all the stairs were covered with the books because the bookcase was knocked down, that was on the hallway. Um, realized they couldn’t turn on the light.  We couldn’t open the garage door.  We had to go through the front door.  Then grabbed couple of clothes.  By the time we went outside, our neighbors had, but it was shivering, shaking outside.  Because, uh, everybody just ran out from the house.  And my godson was here, was sleeping downstairs in the basement area.  And he first didn’t know what’s going on.  His mirror got knocked over from the floor, from the wall.  So, finally he heard us and then he came.  So we were standing outside and uh, he managed to open up the garage door, to detach, um, the rail and open up the garage door.  And then luckily we had a van.  We moved the van out and then that’s where we  were sitting because we were not able to come back.  It was the aftershocks were happening like every five, ten minutes.  So we spend the rest of the night outside.  It was like 4 o’clock, 4 or 3 in the afternoon, in the morning.  Spend the rest of the morning outside.  Everybody was outside, whoever could escape. Some people got trapped. Yeah, it was pretty devastating.  So, in the morning when we assess what really happened we came into the house.  Everything was out.  I mean the, from the cabinet, the, the glasses were broken the sugar.  The, the, the, the, what is it?  Honey all over.  I mean, this place on the kitchen looked like you couldn’t step anywhere.  The television was knocked out in the middle of the room.  The bio, the, the, the piano was in the middle.  We had a big fish tank.  The fish were all over in the carpet.  We tried to pick up what we could, but since it was so dangerous.  There were all the aftershocks were happening.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Delilah Kujala (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/11/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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