Indiana 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 80s/90s

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1910s/1920s

PLACE OF BIRTH: North Manchester, Indiana

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The only information we have on this subject is that she was raised on a farm in the early 20th century, making her a good example of an older, rural Indiana dialect.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Christia Ward

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/05/2004

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Uh, I have a family of seven sisters and one brother.  We lived on a farm, was very similar to the Amish people. We milked, uh, 14 head of, uh, cows every morning. Uh, we got up at 5 o’clock.  We had to, uh, milk, and, uh, we had one old cow that wore kickers, because she kicked so bad.  An’ we had, uh, to clean the strainer, and the separator and everything before we could get on a school bus, then go to school.  Now school bus usually came around 7 o’clock.  Well, I’d go to school all day.  Then I’d come home.  First thing I had to do was go in the house, change my clothes, then go out to the barn and start, uh, bringing the cows in for the milking time.  And we fed the chickens and slopped the hogs, and then we might be out in the barn till ‘bout 6 o’clock, ‘cause we always had to scrape the bottom and put lime on the floor.  And we never wore shoes ‘cause we didn’t have ‘em. We were a poor family; we didn’t have shoes to wear.  And a lot times they’d wear out, and we — my mother would put cardboard in the bottom, the soles of our shoes.  But we were always clean.  Mother made our— our unders out of, uh, feedsacks, that she buy the feed in for the chickens.  They were prints, and, uh, she would sew us — we had buttons on our panties, and, uh, we was raised verly, verly [sic] poorly.  We canned.  We put up a big garden every year and we canned, and, uh, butchered.  And, uh, my job when we butchered was to stir the lard.  And, um, one year we were butcherin’ and a cow had a calf, way back in the back field.  And, uh, we had to go back in the field and get that calf, and the snow was real deep.   And we went back and, uh, got that calf before it freeze to death, and, uh, it was a hard job.  But you know, I wouldn’t want to be raised any other way, because, uh, all of the girls has turned out to be real good girls.  I have two sisters dead, and one brother.  My mother and dad passed away ’74 and ’76, and, uh, as far as coming out of a big family, I wouldn’t want it any other way, and, uh, us girls has turned out to be terrific girls.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/02/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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