Kazakhstan 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/12/1986

PLACE OF BIRTH: Semipalatinsk (Semey), in eastern Kazakhstan

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Russian (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: Subject was in his fourth year of university at the time of this recording.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in Almaty, Kazakhstan, for several years. He also lived in Lawrence, Kansas, in the United States while studying one year of high school as well as two years of college.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

He began learning English at a private school in what was then Russia at age 13.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Mackenzie Wiglesworth

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/04/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in 1986, in Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan. Back then it was Soviet Union. So, I like pretty much born in a country that does not exist anymore. I consider myself to be a citizen of the world. Even though I’m Russian, I’ve never been to Russia. Kazaks and Russians are very different people, well, same same background pretty much but, uh, different ethnicities, different languages. I’m ethnically Russian because like Kazakhstan is a huge country like, more than thirty ethnicities linked, lived side by side there you know? Well I lived in uh the capital, that’s like, the most beautiful years of my life, one of the most beautiful. It’s where I went to college, it’s a big city, one point five million people living there. And it’s like night life is amazing, got my first love there, like whole bunch of first impressions you know? My high school’s a boarding school so like me and my friends are really close because we live uh for…five days a week under same roof you know, eating from same pot. On the weekends we would go out café know? To a bar or to a restaurant or we have like a park or a square like central square we’ll just gather like where young people gather and we can rumors gossips, you know gossips. People start getting ready for New Year’s a month ahead, reservation at restaurants you know, buying gifts, buying clothes, like looking special, everyone’s, one wants to be as special as possible you know? And its usually last for five days at least you know? My last New Years at home lasted like the party lasted like ten days. I don’t like American food you know? I can eat a burger but, I don’t consider something that you can eat in the car on the go to be like a meal you know? Makes you full, but I consider it a snack or something for me like, I like cooking you know, like when I get inspirations…Russian cuisine and Kazak cuisine are very different, Kazak’s are usually uh historically Nomads, you know traveling around with herds of uh of uh cattle. So, whole bunch of in there uh nutrition there is whole bunch of meat and I eat horse, horse sausage is amazing. And like, uh dairy products, many types of cheese you know and like uh cotton, cottage cheese, cream, I actually live, like like when you get the fresh milk just from cow you know and let it stand a little bit and there’s a whole bunch of cream on top, I, I love it you know. Kazak language is based on Turkic roots, Russian is on Slavic, and for example, “Hello” in Russian would be [demonstrates] and in Kazak it’ll be [demonstrates] it’s like “thank you” in Russian is uh[demonstrates] and in Kazak [demonstrates] I like this is like one of my favorite poems, I just like it! I memorized it, they made us memorize whole bunch of poems in literature classes back at home and this one really stuck in mind and it’s they put it in a song you know, so, I really this one. It’s uh, [demonstrates] it’s uh, starts out, “Sail” and Lermontov is very worldwide famoused Russian poet you know. I, I, I, I’m not really like, poet reader, poem reader, but I’ll try my best. Uh… [He speaks poem in Russian.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Mackenzie Wiglesworth

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/04/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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