Manitoba 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 57

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/10/1959

PLACE OF BIRTH: Surrey, British Columbia

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Canadian/Caucasian

OCCUPATION: lawyer

EDUCATION: B.A., LL.B., LL.M., C.A.E.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

After being born in British Columbia, the subject lived in the United States (Washington State and Oregon) from ages 1 to 5. He lived in London, England, for one year in his early thirties. He also resided for nine-month periods over the course of three years in Brandon, Manitoba, while in his thirties. He’s lived most of the rest of his life in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Subject

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/09/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Surrey, British Columbia, then spent the first five years of my life in Washington State in the United States and Oregon State, near Seattle and Portland, respectively. Uh, then I moved Winnipeg in grade two. I’ve lived in Winnipeg, uh, all of my life except for a one-year period when I was in London, England, in my early thirties. Other than that there were, uh, periods of about nine months each over three years. So three periods of nine months when I lived in Brandon, Manitoba. Other than that I’ve lived here in Winnipeg except for three-month stints in the Des Moines, Iowa, in my mid-twenties, in Banff, Alberta, in my mid-twenties, and in Tenerife, in the Canary Islands, in my early thirties.

Some phrases we use around Winnipeg are: “How’s it going, eh?” Also, “Have a nice day.” We say, “See ya” a lot. I don’t know if there’s any other things that are, uh, common here that aren’t common elsewhere, although those may be common elsewhere. Oh, I guess when they’re winning, you hear a fair amount of, “How about those Jets?” meaning our professional hockey team.

What’s life like in Winnipeg? Well, there are beautiful summers. They tend to be very hot and dry with blue skies. You usually get four or five days of blue skies and then, traditionally, a thunderstorm. Uh, winter of course: very cold. Uh, people don’t seem to mind. They, they just go about their business.

Until my early fifties, I’d never played hockey. Well, I played in grade two and not since then. Took it up because my kids started playing. I took up goaltending, and it wasn’t ’til then I realized what a hockey town this place is. It seems to be a unifying thing. It takes place all over the, all over the city in outdoor rinks, in indoor rinks; uh, people of all races and, uh, cultures, if they’ve been here long enough, play. It’s a very interesting thing.

Idioms: These are four from my college days: There was “eye,” which meant television. There was “best,” which was, uh, chopped-up potatoes boiled in oil. There was “same,” which meant you agree with somebody, and there was “clubbed,” which means somebody, uh, got hurt or hurt themselves. So I guess I was remiss for not beginning this with “How’s it going, eh?” and ending it with “Have a nice day.”

TRANSCRIBED BY: Subject

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION: 28/09/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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