New Mexico 2

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples.  IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 66

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/08/1943

PLACE OF BIRTH: Isleta Pueblo, New Mexico

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Native American (Isleta Pueblo)

OCCUPATION: retired casino executive

EDUCATION: two years of college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born and raised in Isleta Pueblo, New Mexico.  Lived “outside” of the pueblo for 25 years (in California, Arizona, and Louisiana) before returning to Isleta.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Tanera Marshall

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/09/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

When my father would call me, when we were out and about, you know, moving or (and we were in California, we were in Louisiana, we were in Arizona), and my father would call me, and I would actually have to stop and listen and then it’d come back to me how to respond to him in the language. But I never really lost it, you know, ’cause … And my husband is not, uh, Isleta, and couldn’t speak Tiwa; he’s Laguna and he speaks Keresan, and so the only way we communicated with each other was in English. And so I couldn’t speak the language all the time. But when my father called, ah, after a while, um, I had to stop for a while and listen to him and then I would respond. And then it just flowed. It, it — I never really lost it. You know we have so many traditional customs and when you’re away from it for a while you forget, well …um … “What am I supposed to do first?” — you know, that kind of thing. And then … but then it does all come back to you. And so it wasn’t that hard, but it was just … I guess the hardest thing was just getting back into it because there is always something going on. It’s never —you’re never away from it. It’s, uh, like, uh, uh weekly if not a … Certain times of the year, it can be an everyday thing, ‘K? Yer, you’re continually with the traditions by: you have to do this, you have to do this today and you have to do that tomorrow, and do you have this, and you need that, that kind of thing. It’s an ongoing thing.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Tanera Marshall

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/09/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

The most distinctive thing about her dialect is her “breath-grouping.” Thoughts and sentences are broken into relatively short phrases, which are frequently separated by pauses, even breaths.

COMMENTARY BY: Tanera Marshall

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/09/2009

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.